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Asus adds Nvidia Ion to all-in-one Eee PC

Drops the touch-sensitive screen

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Asus' Eee Top all-in-one desktop PCs may have been originally conceived as touch-operated devices, but the company has now launched a model without a touch-sensitive display. The good news: it uses Nvidia's Ion platform to give it some graphics oomph.

Asus Eee Top 2002

Asus' Eee Top 2002: not touch-sensitive for a change

The Eee Top 2002 is based on a 20in, 16:9 widescreen display of unspecified resolution - probably 1366 x 768 - and an Intel Atom 330 dual-core chip. There's 2GB of DDR 2 memory in there and a 5400rpm 3Gb/s Sata hard drive of 320GB capacity.

A tray-load multi-format DVD writer, a three-in-one memory card reader, a trio of USB 2.0 ports, a pair of 3W speakers, 802.11n Wi-Fi and Gigabit Ethernet make up the remaining key features.

Unimpressed with the lack of touch-sensitivity? There's a version, the 2000T, which has just such a feature for you. And if the screen's not big enough, the graphics not sufficiently powerful, or you feel the Atom CPU's too weak, Asus also launched the Eee Top 2203T. The range offers a selection of Core 2 Duo processors, an AMD ATI Radeon HD 4570 graphics chip and a 22in, 16:9 screen.

Asus Eee Top 2203T

The 2203T: a big screen plus a mainstream CPU and GPU

Other specs match those of the 2002T, though a Blu-ray Disc drive will offered as an option.

There's no word yet on availabiity or pricing in local markets - so far, the three desktops have only been launched in Asus' native Taiwan. ®

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