Feeds

Linux: More contributors, more code

A lot more than just Linus Torvalds

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Averaged over the past four and a half years, the top ten individuals have contributed 12 per cent of the Linux kernel code, and the top 30 developers accounted for 25 per cent of the code. And guess who has fallen off the top 30 Linux kernel development list? None other than Linus Torvalds, who has a total of 729 changes from Linux 2.6.11 through 2.6.30, with 254 of them spanning from Linux 2.6.24 through 2.6.30.

"Linus remains an active and crucial part of the development process," the report quickly says, and "his contribution cannot be measured just by the number of changes made. (Obscure technical detail: these numbers do not count “merge commits,” where one set of changes is merged into another. Linus Torvalds generates large numbers of merge commits; had these been counted he would have shown up on this list.) Linus of course does a great deal of reviewing and signoffs of code."

If you look at the Git repository for Linux 2.6.12 through Linux 2.6.30, Bartlomiej Zolnierkiewicz, who is a student at Warsaw University of Technology, tops the list, with 1,169 changes (1.8 per cent of the total), just edging out Ingo Molnar of Red Hat, who has racked up 1,164 changes to the kernel in the past few years. Number three on the list is David Miller, who is one of the maintainers of the TCP/IP networking stack and the key developer who ports Linux to the Sparc architecture. Chris Mason, who works at Oracle, is number four, with 851 changes, followed by Takashi Iwai, of Novell, with 711 changes.

As you might expect from an open source effort such as Linux kernel development, those claiming no affiliation or corporate sponsorship account for most of the changes in the Linux 2.6 kernel since Linux 2.6.24, with a total of 13,850 changes to the kernel and representing 21.1 per cent of all changes; those with an unknown affiliation accounted for 2,765 changes, or 4.2 per cent.

Of the corporate sponsors, Red Hat accounts for the most changes in the latest releases of the Linux kernel, with 7,897 (12 per cent), followed by IBM with 4,150 changes (6.3 per cent), Novell with 4,021 changes (6.1 per cent), Intel with 3,923 changes (6 per cent), and Oracle with 2,003 changes (3.1 per cent).

While these programmers make the changes to Linux, the developers who sign off on the changes also carry a heavy burden, with Andrew Morton accounting for 6,515 approvals, or about 10.5 per cent of the total since Linux 2.6.24, followed by Ingo Molnar with 6,174 signoffs and David Miller with 5,954. Linus Torvalds shows up as number nine on this list, with 1,664 signoffs since Linux 2.6.24, or about 2.7 per cent of the burden.

By employer, Red Hat does the most signing off by far, with 22,652 or 36.4 per cent of the total, followed by Google with 6,530 (10.5 per cent), and Novell with 5,076 (8.2 per cent). The Linux Foundation gets credit for Torvalds' signoffs, since it writes his paycheck. ®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Oh no, Joe: WinPhone users already griping over 8.1 mega-update
Hang on. Which bit of Developer Preview don't you understand?
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS
Nearly 50% have NEVER tweeted a word
Internet-of-stuff startup dumps NoSQL for ... SQL?
NoSQL taste great at first but lacks proper nutrients, says startup cloud whiz
Next Windows obsolescence panic is 450 days from … NOW!
The clock is ticking louder for Windows Server 2003 R2 users
Ditch the sync, paddle in the Streem: Upstart offers syncless sharing
Upload, delete and carry on sharing afterwards?
Microsoft TIER SMEAR changes app prices whether devs ask or not
Some go up, some go down, Redmond goes silent
Batten down the hatches, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS due in TWO DAYS
Admins dab straining server brows in advance of Trusty Tahr's long-term support landing
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.