Feeds
85%
Intel X25-M

Intel X25-M 34nm Flash SSD

The chip giant's second-gen solid-state drive

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Active power consumption remains unchanged at 150mW, while idle power consumption rises slightly, from 60mW to 75mW.

Intel X25-M

This time the back of the board is empty... how long before a 320GB drive appears?

The major change that results in the change in fabrication process is a reduction in production cost which, in turn, leads to lower retail prices. When Intel launched the 1G drives, the prices were $595/£399 for the 80GB model and $945/£799 for the 160GB version. When the competition started to pile into the SSD market with drives that used controllers from Indilinx, JMicron and Samsung, we saw Intel’s prices drop to $390/£207 and $765/£506, respectively.

The 2G drives are priced significantly lower: $225/£172 for the 80GB and $440/£334 for the 160GB.

You can't compare the price of Intel SSDs with the other manufacturers' offerings directly as the storage capacities differ. Intel offers 80GB and 160GB, while Samsung has 128GB and 256GB drives, and the memory companies round off the capacities to 120GB and 250GB.

If we look at the cost per gigabyte, the Intel drives started at £5 per GB which was reduced to £2.59 per GB and £3.16 per GB when the 1G drives had their price cuts. With 2G, those prices come down to £2.15 per GB (80GB) and £2.09 per GB (160GB) which is very similar to the competition and it puts the Intel, Indilinx and Samsung controllers on an even footing.

Externally, the 2G Intel drive has undergone a few changes. The casing has changed in colour from black to silver, and the drive has been slimmed down from 9mm to 6.5mm so it can fit in any laptop drive bay. Intel supplies a plastic spacer that can be attached to ensure the drive fits snugly in a larger bay.

Intel X25-M

Intel includes a spacer for bigger drive bays

In the past, we've reviewed the 80GB X25-M and now with 2G we have finally got our hands on a 160GB drive with pre-release 2CV102G2 firmware. We tested the 2G alongside the 80GB X25-M and a 128GB Patriot Torqx which has an Indilinx controller. All three were fitted into a Core i7 system using 32-bit Windows Vista Ultimate Edition.

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
PEAK APPLE: iOS 8 is least popular Cupertino mobile OS in all of HUMAN HISTORY
'Nerd release' finally staggers past 50 per cent adoption
Tim Cook: The classic iPod HAD to DIE, and this is WHY
Apple, er, couldn’t get the parts for HDD models
Apple spent just ONE DOLLAR beefing up the latest iPad Air 2
New iPads look a lot like the old one. There's a reason for that
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
Caterham Seven 160 review: The Raspberry Pi of motoring
Back to driving's basics with a joyously legal high
Back to the ... drawing board: 'Hoverboard' will disappoint Marty McFly wannabes
Buzzing board (and some future apps) leave a lot to be desired
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
Protecting against web application threats using SSL
SSL encryption can protect server‐to‐server communications, client devices, cloud resources, and other endpoints in order to help prevent the risk of data loss and losing customer trust.