Feeds
80%
iMiEV_SM

Mitsubishi iMiEV five-door e-car

Genuinely fun to drive

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The iMiEV's motive power comes from an electric motor with a maximum 47kW (63bhp) output and a 88-cell, 16kWh 330V lithium-ion battery pack. While the motor's power output may not sound that exciting, its torque figure of 180Nm (133lb ft) – all of it on tap from rest, remember – suggests the fun quotient may be higher than expected.

Mitsubishi iMiEV

Set the motor mode with an auto-esque lever

While driving around town at low speeds, the iMiEV behaves exactly like any other super-mini. It's only when you plant the throttle and discover that torque-steer is noticeable only by its absence and that all that low-end torque can flick you towards the horizon rather faster than expected that you realize that this isn't just another small hatchback.

The iMiEV's combination of a high profile and rear-wheel drive didn't exactly instill us with confidence but the car's low centre of gravity – a handy side effect of the floor-fitted 200kg battery pack, which accounts for 20 per cent of the car's total weight – makes it a remarkably agile and stable vehicle. Despite some deliberately hamfisted and over enthusiastic cornering, we never came close to having a seriously brown moment.

For all Mitsubishi's claims that the iMiEV is a city car designed for local commutes and the school run, it's an absolute hoot to drive hard on the open road and this can easily deflect drivers from its environmental raison d'être.

Mitsubishi claims the car will cover the 0-60mph sprint in under 13 seconds, but that number belies the car's sprightliness in getting from a standstill to 30 - which we reckon takes about five seconds - and its mid-range urge, which is never less than impressive. Floor the throttle at 40mph and as the power demand needle buries itself in the right-hand side of the gauge the iMiEV surges forward in a manner that can easily catch you unaware.

Mitsubishi iMiEV

Sprightly mover

Officially, the iMiEV's top speed is 81mph but proving that on the open road would obviously be illegal so lets just say it gets to the motorway speed limit – and stays there - with ease, and leave it at that.

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Boffins attempt to prove the UNIVERSE IS JUST A HOLOGRAM
Is this the real life? Is this just fantasy?
Our LOHAN spaceplane ballocket Kickstarter climbs through £8000
Through 25 per cent but more is needed: Get your UNIQUE rewards!
NASA to reformat Opportunity rover's memory from 125 million miles away
Interplanetary admins will back up data and get to work
LOHAN tunes into ultra long range radio
And verily, Vultures shall speak status unto distant receivers
SpaceX prototype rocket EXPLODES over Texas. 'Tricky' biz, says Elon Musk
No injuries or near injuries. Flight stayed in designated area
Galileo, Galileo! Galileo, Galileo! Galileo fit to go. Magnifico
I'm just a poor boy, nobody loves me. But at least I can find my way with ESA GPS by 2017
EOS, Lockheed to track space junk from Oz
WA facility gets laser-eyes out of the fog
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?