Feeds

Sony promises clarity on virtualization-free Vaio PCs

Windows 7 minus XP Mode

Security for virtualized datacentres

Sony has promised to be more upfront with Vaio customers after blocking their ability to work with hardware virtualization from Intel.

Senior manager for product marketing Xavier Lauwaert has told The Reg: "I'll take the action to be clearer on our site that VT will not be enabled."

After discovering that Intel's virtualization technology - VT - does not work on their new Vaios, some customers complained that Sony's advertising had not been clear on this subject.

VT is a part of the Intel Core 2 Duo chips used by the Viaos, so users understandably assumed VT would work out of the box. But Sony deliberately stopped the Vaio BIOS from working with VT.

Users have also complained about not being able to get their money back on machines they had bought. But Lauwaert said customers should be able to get refunds.

Lauwaert was speaking after users last week raged at Sony for stopping the Vaios' BIOS from working with VT in the Core 2 Duos.

VT will let customers with Windows XP applications run their software using Windows XP Mode, a virtualized environment that'll run inside the Windows 7 desktop.

Customers have been buying Vaios in anticipation of Windows 7's shipment in October, with the consumer electronics giant pushing Vaios through its site as the perfect fit for Windows 7

But Sony's site does not make it clear that VT in the Intel chips does not work.

As of writing, on Thursday afternoon, Sony did not appear to have updated its site to make it clear VT does not work on the Vaios.

Lauwaert said Sony had been taken by surprise by the level of demand for VT, and - again - he committed Sony to supporting VT in Vaios in future. But - again - he was unable to say when this would happen.

The product manager said the Vaio Z series would be "top of the list" for getting VT support in the US. Lauwaert covers the US market and said he was unable to comment on Sony's plans for allowing the BIOS of Sony notebooks sold in Europe to work with Intel's VT.

In the meantime, Reg reader Ji Yong sent us a link that might help you side-step Sony's nobbling of the Vaio BIOS here.

Yong's advice came with a caveat: "Of course, if you screw it up, you really are screwed. But if you can work a bit careful, it is doable for anyone who isn't scared of a command line."

You've been warned. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
IBM storage revenues sink: 'We are disappointed,' says CEO
Time to put the storage biz up for sale?
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
CAGE MATCH: Microsoft, Dell open co-located bit barns in Oz
Whole new species of XaaS spawning in the antipodes
VMware's tool to harden virtual networks: a spreadsheet
NSX security guide lands in intriguing format
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.