Feeds

Publishing giant hits delete on internal IT staff

Job cuts ahoy

Security for virtualized datacentres

Business publisher Reed Elsevier is outsourcing its IT support staff. Their jobs will go to HCL Technologies, a leading Indian offshorer.

The move has not gone down well, in part because TUPE (Transfer of Undertakings Regulations - essentially moving staff from one employer to another) will not cover staff's increasingly rare final salary pension scheme. Reed's pension scheme is a particularly nicely gold-plated, copper-bottomed example of the genre.

Staff who contacted us complained that the process, billed as a review, actually aims to get staff moved by 1 October. The email sent to staff also warns that some people will lose their jobs.

The review of help desk functions aims to move to one global support unit for the whole business. The email, which talks of "open dialogue" and "sharing as much detail as possible", said a decision should be reached by 18 September.

Two senior staff - Hank Hamilton and Ray Raggi - "have decided to pursue interests outside the company", according to the email.

The mail says that Reed is still considering external partners but our source named HCL as the likely recipient of the work. HCL is also named in the FAQ sent to staff. The document says HCL staff will soon start attending weekly forum meetings to discuss the move.

It also answered the question, Why did you choose HCL? Answer: "HCL best met the needs of the business and its strategy. They are leaders in infrastructure operations and are one of the few vendors approached that were prepared to TUPE staff to themselves."

About 60 people in operations, systems administration, business systems and infrastructure services will be affected by the move.

Desktop support, another 60 people, is a possible future target, according to our source. They added that the announcement had sent morale to rock bottom because most believed redundancies last year were the end of a difficult period for the company.

Reed refused to comment on the plans. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Apple CEO Tim Cook: TV is TERRIBLE and stuck in the 1970s
The iKing thinks telly is far too fiddly and ugly – basically, iTunes
Huawei ditches new Windows Phone mobe plans, blames poor sales
Giganto mobe firm slams door shut on Microsoft. OH DEAR
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.