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openSUSE will sacrifice 10.3 release on Halloween

But confirms 11.2 for this fall

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The openSUSE project, which creates the Linux development distro that ultimately ends up being Novell's SUSE Linux Enterprise in desktop, server, and other variants, is mothballing an old development release.

The project icing just as it has taken another step toward meeting its goal of delivering a new release this fall.

The project has announced that openSUSE 10.3, which has been out since October 2007, will be bumped off on October 31. After that, no more updates and patches will be available for this development distro. The project intends to support openSUSE 11.0 until June 30 next year, and openSUSE 11.1, the current release will be supported until December 31 next year.

openSUSE 11.2, which is currently being crafted under the code-name "Fichte" - in case you forgot that SUSE Linux was German, and apparently after German philosopher Johann Gottlieg Fichte - is on track to be launched on November 12, according to this EOL announcement for openSUSE 10.3.

This week, the openSUSE project said that it had reached Milestone 5, with openSUSE 11.2 now based on the Linux 2.6.31-rc4 kernel and supporting the Xen 3.4.1 RC10 and VirtualBox 3.0.2 hypervisors, the Gnome 2.27.5 and KDE 4.3 graphical user interfaces, and a slew of updated packages that you can read all about here.

The whole shebang is built using the GNU GCC 4.4.1 compilers. You can download openSUSE 11.2 Milestone 5 here for x86 and x64 machines. This is still beta code, and not intended for production environments, of course.

When openSUSE 11.2 does ship this November, it will be supported by the project for two releases plus two months, giving testers and users plenty of time to get current with a more modern release to stay patched. ®

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