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Exploding iPhone injures French teen

'He did not lose an eye'

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A French teenager has been injured by his girlfriend's exploding iPhone, little more than a week after Apple was accused of trying to suppress news of an exploding iPod Touch.

According to the AFP, Marie-Dominique Kolega contacted Apple after her son was hit by a flying piece of Jobsian status symbol. Apparently, the iPhone made a hissing noise before the screen shattered, sending shards through the air. "My son was frightened but he did not lose an eye," Kolega told AFP.

Earlier this month, Liverpudlian Ken Stanborough told The Times of London that after he contacted Apple about his daughter's exploding iPod Touch - which made its own hissing sound before rocketing ten feet in the air - the company said it would refund the price of the device if Stanborough and daughter signed a confidentiality agreement banning them from publicly discussing the incident.

Meanwhile, a recent investigation from the a Seattle TV station found that at least 15 people have complained of fire- and burn-related iPod incidents. This info was culled from an 800-page Consumer Product Safety Commission document, and according to the TV station, Apple lawyers tried to suppress that too. ®

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