Feeds

Sex Offenders returns to iTunes

Vigilante-friendly app back after short break

Top three mobile application threats

Days after being pulled for undisclosed reasons, the Offender Locator is back on iTunes, bringing relief to paranoid parents across the USA, except in California.

Offender Locator appeared in the iTunes store last week priced at 59 pence, and was swiftly pulled a few days later, possibly on the grounds that charging for information about the homes of private individuals is illegal in California at least. But now it's back, and joined by competition in the form of Sex Offenders Search, priced at £1.19 for those prepared to pay a little more for the safety of their children.

The applications show useful pinpricks showing the home location of sex offenders - using publicly-available information of dubious accuracy - and are selling well despite all the arguments about abuse generally coming from people the children know. The predatory paedophile lurking behind every tree is a much easier reality for concerned parents to understand, and to deal with.

But the limp-wristed liberals in California keep insisting that companies can't make money selling such information, thus prompting the warnings that accompany both products:

"[Sex Offenders Search] is currently not displaying data regarding California registered sex offenders until we are certain that doing so is allowed by law", though all is not necessarily lost as "users who have already purchased a copy of SOS on or prior to Aug. 7, 2009 should still be able to view the complete set of data."

For the absurdly paranoid parent in California there are alternatives, as explained by ThinAir Wireless, publishers of Offender Locator:

"California Sex Offender is unavailable at this time in the paid version of our application. You must use Offender Locator Lite version to access this data."

Or you could point your web browser, iPhone or otherwise, at the database hosted by LogSat Software, publishers of Sex Offenders Search, or perhaps just calm down, have a cup of tea and find something more sensible to worry about. ®

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
Virgin Media so, so SORRY for turning spam fire-hose on its punters
Hundreds of emails flood inboxes thanks to gaffe
A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally
Breakfast in London, lunch in NYC, and your clothes in Peru
AT&T threatens to pull out of FCC wireless auctions over purchase limits
Company wants ability to buy more spectrum space in auction
Turnbull leaves Australia's broadband blackspots in the dark
New Statement of Expectations to NBN Co offers get-out clauses for blackspot builds
Facebook claims 100 MEEELLION active users in India
Who needs China when you've got the next billion in your sights?
Facebook splats in-app chat, whacks brats into crack yakety-yak app
Jibber-jabbering addicts turfed out just as Zuck warned
Google looks to LTE and Wi-Fi to help it lube YouTube tubes
Bandwidth hogger needs tube embiggenment if it's to succeed
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.