Feeds

Sex Offenders returns to iTunes

Vigilante-friendly app back after short break

Eight steps to building an HP BladeSystem

Days after being pulled for undisclosed reasons, the Offender Locator is back on iTunes, bringing relief to paranoid parents across the USA, except in California.

Offender Locator appeared in the iTunes store last week priced at 59 pence, and was swiftly pulled a few days later, possibly on the grounds that charging for information about the homes of private individuals is illegal in California at least. But now it's back, and joined by competition in the form of Sex Offenders Search, priced at £1.19 for those prepared to pay a little more for the safety of their children.

The applications show useful pinpricks showing the home location of sex offenders - using publicly-available information of dubious accuracy - and are selling well despite all the arguments about abuse generally coming from people the children know. The predatory paedophile lurking behind every tree is a much easier reality for concerned parents to understand, and to deal with.

But the limp-wristed liberals in California keep insisting that companies can't make money selling such information, thus prompting the warnings that accompany both products:

"[Sex Offenders Search] is currently not displaying data regarding California registered sex offenders until we are certain that doing so is allowed by law", though all is not necessarily lost as "users who have already purchased a copy of SOS on or prior to Aug. 7, 2009 should still be able to view the complete set of data."

For the absurdly paranoid parent in California there are alternatives, as explained by ThinAir Wireless, publishers of Offender Locator:

"California Sex Offender is unavailable at this time in the paid version of our application. You must use Offender Locator Lite version to access this data."

Or you could point your web browser, iPhone or otherwise, at the database hosted by LogSat Software, publishers of Sex Offenders Search, or perhaps just calm down, have a cup of tea and find something more sensible to worry about. ®

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

More from The Register

next story
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
Bring back error correction, say Danish 'net boffins
We don't need no steenkin' TCP/IP retransmission and the congestion it causes
GoTenna: How does this 'magic' work?
An ideal product if you believe the Earth is flat
Samsung Z Tizen OS mobe is post-phoned – this time for good?
Russian launch for Sammy's non-droid knocked back
Telstra to KILL 2G network by end of 2016
GSM now stands for Grave-Seeking-Mobile network
Seeking LTE expert to insert small cells into BT customers' places
Is this the first step to a FON-a-like 4G network?
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.