Feeds

Amazon teaches cloud to speak Pig Latin

Adoophay orfay ethay assesmay

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Amazon has taught its cloud to speak Pig Latin.

In April, Jeff Bezos and company unveiled a new web service based on Hadoop, the open-source phenomenon that seeks to mimic MapReduce, the distributed data-crunching platform that drives Google's online infrastructure. And today, Amazon announced that its Elastic MapReduce service now includes support for Pig Latin, the Hadoop programming language first developed at Yahoo!.

You can write straight to Hadoop in Java, but Pig puts Hadoop programming on a somewhat higher level. As Amazon puts it: "Pig Latin is a SQL-like data transformation language. You can use Pig Latin to run complex processes on large-scale compute clusters without having to spend time learning the MapReduce paradigm."

But the SQL comparison is a tad misleading. Hive - a Hadoop programming language seeded by Facebook - is closer to SQL, as is a second as-yet-unnamed language under development at Yahoo!. Pig sits somewhere between the SQL-like paradigm and the low-level code of MapReduce.

Amazon offers two means of using Pig: an "Interactive mode," which lets you run Pig queries on an existing MapReduce cluster by setting up an secure shell connection, and a "batch mode," which involves launching multiple MapReduce server instances that reference your Pig Latin.

Based on Google-published research papers, Hadoop mimics the company's MapReduce framework, which maps data-crunching tasks across distributed machines, splitting them into sub-tasks, before reducing the results into one master calculation. Thus Amazon Elastic MapReduce.

The Apache-hosted Hadoop was originally developed by Nutch-crawler founder Doug Cutting. After three and half years at Yahoo! developing the platform, Cutting is now headed for Cloudera, a Silicon Valley startup that has commercialized Hadoop - Red Hat-style. ®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Oh no, Joe: WinPhone users already griping over 8.1 mega-update
Hang on. Which bit of Developer Preview don't you understand?
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS
Nearly 50% have NEVER tweeted a word
Next Windows obsolescence panic is 450 days from … NOW!
The clock is ticking louder for Windows Server 2003 R2 users
Ditch the sync, paddle in the Streem: Upstart offers syncless sharing
Upload, delete and carry on sharing afterwards?
Microsoft TIER SMEAR changes app prices whether devs ask or not
Some go up, some go down, Redmond goes silent
Batten down the hatches, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS due in TWO DAYS
Admins dab straining server brows in advance of Trusty Tahr's long-term support landing
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.