Feeds

AMD demos live Magny-Cours migration

More French lessons needed

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

Now that virtualization has become a key driver of x64 server sales, the ability to live-migrate workloads from machines using older chip generation to newer and future ones is important to data centers - which is why AMD's latest nerd porn demonstrates its Opteron architecture performing inter-generational migrations.

The company's future twelve-shooter Magny-Cours Opteron processor, due in 2010's Opteron 6000 series servers using the G34 socket and related chipset, is featured in the latest AMD video.

Magny-Cours, by the way, is not really a twelve-shooter as much as it's two six-shooters sharing the same holster.

The demo stars Ron Meyers, product marketing manager for AMD's server and workstation business, and puts VMware's latest ESX Server 4.0 hypervisor on a bunch of different Opteron boxes from Dell, Sun Microsystems, and Hewlett-Packard. A video workload running on a system using the old two-core Rev E Opterons from a few years back is live-migrated to a new system using the six-core Istanbul Opterons.

Then, before the video even gets warm on the Istanbul box, Meyers live-migrates it using the VMotion feature of ESX Server onto a prototype Opteron 6000 system using the Magny-Cours chips.

OK, admittedly, this is not particularly exciting, but we're in the dog days of a slow-news summer.

But it does give me a chance to bring something else up: Even after many years of studying French, I'm having a very hard time not calling this future twelve-shooter "mangey cores" - even though I know it's more closely pronounced "many core", with just the softest hint of a "g" in there.

This is probably not the kind of image that AMD is trying to inspire about its future flagship chip. Hopefully it's not going to turn out to be some kind of Freudian slip mixed with premonition, because Intel sure needs to have competitive pressure on it at all times.

I will leave it up to you to do something clever with Lisbon, or more precisely, Lisboa, Magny-Cours' six-core baby brother to be put into the Opteron 4000 series systems and using the C32 socket and related chipsets sometime in 2010. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway
Combine Blu-ray and M-DISC and you get this monster
US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux
OAM takes wireless signals to 32 Gbps
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Apple flops out 2FA for iCloud in bid to stop future nude selfie leaks
Millions of 4chan users howl with laughter as Cupertino slams stable door
Students playing with impressive racks? Yes, it's cluster comp time
The most comprehensive coverage the world has ever seen. Ever
Run little spreadsheet, run! IBM's Watson is coming to gobble you up
Big Blue's big super's big appetite for big data in big clouds for big analytics
Seagate's triple-headed Cerberus could SAVE the DISK WORLD
... and possibly bring us even more HAMR time. Yay!
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.