Feeds

Exploding iPod backfires on Apple

Owner flees to The Times

High performance access to file storage

Apple is accused of trying to silence a father and his daughter with a legal gagging after the girl’s iPod Touch had inexplicably exploded.

Ken Stanborough,47, from Liverpool, told The Times that Apple would refund his money only if the pair signed a confidentiality agreement banning them from talking publicly about the incident.

Stanborough accidentally dropped the iPod Touch last month. It started making a hissing noise and became hotter. He also thought “vapour” could be seen leaking from the player.

Wisely, he threw the device out of his back door and, after 30 seconds, “there was a pop, a big puff of smoke and it went 10ft in the air”.

In a letter to the pair, Apple said that by accepting a refund the Stanboroughs had “to keep the terms and existence of this settlement agreement completely confidential”.

The company warned that any breach of confidentiality “may result in Apple seeking injunctive relief, damages and legal costs against the defaulting persons or parties”.

Stanborough went to the press instead.

A recent investigation by the Seattle TV station Kiro 7 found evidence of at least 15 burn and fire-related incidents blamed by iPod owners on their iPods.

News of iPods, HDDs, laptops and other gadgets bursting into flames or exploding is nothing new.

However, KIRO 7 uncovered the 15 iPod cases from an 800-page Consumer Product Safety Commission document that took over seven months to get hold of. Why? According to the outlet, because “Apple’s lawyers filed exemption after exemption”. ®

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
Reg man builds smart home rig, gains SUPREME CONTROL of DOMAIN – Pics
LightwaveRF and Arduino: Bright ideas for dim DIYers
Leaked pics show EMBIGGENED iPhone 6 screen
Fat-fingered fanbois rejoice over Chinternet snaps
WTF happened to Pac-Man?
In his thirties and still afraid of ghosts
Rounded corners? Pah! Amazon's '3D phone has eye-tracking tech'
Now THAT'S what we call a proper new feature
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
US mobile firms cave on kill switch, agree to install anti-theft code
Slow and kludgy rollout will protect corporate profits
Happy 25th birthday, Game Boy!
Monochrome handset ushered in modern mobile gaming era
Leaked photos may indicate slimmer next-generation iPad
Will iPad Air evolve into iPad Helium?
True optical zoom coming to HTC smartphone cameras
Time to ditch that heavy DSLR? Maybe in a year, year and a half
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.