Feeds

Blackpool acts to avoid fall of Pericles

New revenues and benefits software urgently needed

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

A group of 10 councils led by Blackpool is rushing to find a replacement for the Anite Pericles revenues and benefits system.

The authorities estimate they will spend between £1m and £5m on replacing their Pericles systems. Northgate, which bought Anite in August 2008, is discontinuing the software next year.

Blackpool Council is using an 'accelerated restricted' procurement. "This requirement is urgent due to changes in the revenues and benefits software market outside the control of the authorities," it says in the procurement notice published in the Official Journal of the European Union on 29 July 2009.

It has set an early deadline for receipt of tenders of 17 August. However, in March Blackpool published a prior information notice, asking suppliers to enter into dialogue on providing such a system.

As well as providing and implementing a new revenues and benefits software system compliant with current legislation, the supplier will also help move data from councils' Pericles systems and provide training on its own product. The tender says the system it buys "must be currently operating satisfactorily in a live environment" by a firm which can show it has the ability to implement and support it.

The other councils involved in the procurement are Eden DC, Fylde DC, Newcastle-under-Lyme BC, Rochdale Council, Rushcliffe BC, South Lakeland DC, South Staffordshire Council, Stafford BC and Tameside Council.

Each council may issue its own invitation to tender, but Blackpool is handling the prequalification questionnaire stage for all of them, using the north west's local authority procurement portal known as 'the chest'.

LB Enfield has also published a tender for a new revenues and benefits system, on which it estimates it will spend £2.5m to £7m.

This article was originally published at Kable.

Kable's GC weekly is a free email newsletter covering the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. To register click here.

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
China hopes home-grown OS will oust Microsoft
Doesn't much like Apple or Google, either
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Eat up Martha! Microsoft slings handwriting recog into OneNote on Android
Freehand input on non-Windows kit for the first time
Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code
Two-factor auth enabled for Kernel.org repositories
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?