Feeds

Microsoft airbrushes anti-Apple ad

Cartwheels out of Jobsian threat

The essential guide to IT transformation

Bowing to pressure from Apple's legal department - and that pesky imperative known as "the truth" - Microsoft has edited one of its Laptop Hunter ads to reflect Apple's new MacBook pricing.

As The Reg reported last week, Microsoft COO Kevin Turner was applauded by attendees at the company's Worldwide Partner Conference when he related a phone call from Apple legal complaining that the ad was inaccurate.

In Turner's mind, that call was proof that the Laptop Hunter series was getting under Apple's skin. "It was the greatest single phone call in the history that I've ever taken in business," he said, "I did cartwheels down the hallway."

Apparently, he cartwheeled right into Microsoft's own legal department, and apparently, they advised him that Apple had a point. The ad - featuring a pert law student and her doting mom - was incorrect.

In its original version - which has now been removed from both Microsoft's own website and YouTube - the ad showed the young cutie, Lauren, briefly examining a 15-inch, 2.4GB MacBook Pro. The camera zeroed in on the 'Book's price tag, which read $1,999.

Problem: That MacBook Pro was discontinued in early June and replaced by a 2.53GHz model for $1,699. At the same time, a new 13-inch, 2.26GHz MacBook Pro was added to the line for $1,199.

In the original, Lauren says to mom Sue, "This Mac is $2,000, and that's before adding anything." Mom's response: "Why would you pay twice the price?" Lauren's snappy riposte: "I wouldn't."

In the new version, that price tag is nowhere to be seen, and the witty Lauren-Sue repartee is replaced by Lauren merely saying, "It seems like you're paying a lot for the brand."

AdAge quotes a Microsoft spokeswoman as saying about the change, "We slightly adjusted the ads to reflect the updated pricing of the Mac laptop shown in the TV advertisement. This does not change the focus of the campaign, which is to showcase the value and choice of the PC."

The Reg is reminded of the old Soviet Union's propensity for airbrushing photos to removing offending members of its leadership after they had been purged.

"$1,999 price tag? What $1,999 price tag?" ®

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws
Yep, that one place you'd hoped you wouldn't find 'em
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.