Feeds

Microsoft GPL violation hits memory hole

More theater for open-source faithful

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

OSCON: updated Microsoft has dished up the warm fuzzies for the open-source faithful following an earlier sleight of hand on its massive code drop to GPL.

On Wednesday, at OSCON, the company touted new and existing open-source plug-ins for Office, SQL Server, and its emerging Azure cloud for science and academia.

Tony Hey, corporate vice president of external research at Microsoft's Research, announced a set of plug ins for Microsoft Live@EDU to Moodle released under GPLv2. Microsoft Live@EDU provides online email, IM, calendar, MSN alerts, and Bing search, while Moodle is an open-source, web-based course management system.

This would have been the perfect moment to flag Microsoft Live@EDU as Microsoft's second contribution to GPL in a week, following the milestone donation of 20,000 lines of Linux-driver code used in Hyper-V hypervisor.

The timing and the audience were all right.

But Hey failed to reference the GPL code drop.

And so he should, because two days after Microsoft broke the news about the 20,000-code donation with huge fanfare and much back slapping, it emerged that the Linux driver Microsoft contributed had actually violated the terms of the GPL.

Stephen Hemminger, a principal engineer with open-source network vendor Vyatta and self-proclaimed Linux network plumber, said he'd discovered the Hyper-V code used open-source components under GPL that had been combined with Microsoft binaries. The violation was confirmed here. Microsoft has yet to comment.

Under the terms of the GPL, any module that's been combined with code licensed under GPL must be released under the GPL.

Microsoft not only failed to mention this violation when announcing its contribution, it came out guns blazing to say it was acting to help customers running Linux on Windows.

The less said about the whole episode at OSCON, then, the better.

Hey continued to list Microsoft Office and SQL Server projects it has released under a Creative Commons license - a workflow system called Trident, a context and semantic tool for SQL Server called Zentity, and software for data visualization in Excel, a project called Node XL.

Shifting to Azure, Hey said Microsoft is now using its dev cloud to run a compute-intensive tool called PhiloD, used for statistical analysis of data on the DNA of HIV from large studies. PhiloD crunches one to two thousand CPU hours, and Hey said PhiloD had been put on Azure make the input of data easier.

Hey said Microsoft is trying to create extensions for its various platforms for the scientific community. ®

This article has been updated to clarify that it was Microsoft's plug-ins to Moodle that were released under GPLv2.

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
PEAK APPLE: iOS 8 is least popular Cupertino mobile OS in all of HUMAN HISTORY
'Nerd release' finally staggers past 50 per cent adoption
Microsoft to bake Skype into IE, without plugins
Redmond thinks the Object Real-Time Communications API for WebRTC is ready to roll
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
Mozilla: Spidermonkey ATE Apple's JavaScriptCore, THRASHED Google V8
Moz man claims the win on rivals' own benchmarks
FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on
Next driver to battle fake chips with 'non-invasive' methods
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Ubuntu 14.10 tries pulling a Steve Ballmer on cloudy offerings
Oi, Windows, centOS and openSUSE – behave, we're all friends here
Was ist das? Eine neue Suse Linux Enterprise? Ausgezeichnet!
Version 12 first major-number Suse release since 2009
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.