Feeds

Yahoo! in talks to acquire Gmail add-on

Swoops for Xoopit

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Yahoo! has confirmed its acquisition of Xoopit. You can read the full story here

Yahoo! is apparently on the verge of acquiring Xoopit, a startup offering tools for mining and redistributing all those photos, videos, and other files buried your web-based email client.

Xoopit originally offered its webmailware only as a Firefox plug-in for use with Google's Gmail. Then, in December, Yahoo! rolled the company's tools into an updated version of Yahoo! Mail, the web's most popular email client.

According to The Wall Street Journal, Yahoo! is in "final stage negotiations" with Xoopit, with an eye on acquiring the company for around $20 million. Yahoo! declined to comment on the report. Xoopit did not immediately respond to our requests for comment.

This means we're still in the dark on how to pronounce its rather painful moniker. Some say "ZOO-pit." Other say "SWOO-pit."

However you pronounce it, Xoopit lets you pluck multimedia and data files from your webmail account, before sharing them with friends, colleagues, and the world at large. "Xoopit finds the pictures, videos, and files buried in webmail's gigabytes of free storage and allows users to share, comment, and post them to their contacts on other social networks and blogs," reads the company's boilerplate description.

Sources tell The Journal that Yahoo! is interested in Xoopit as part of its strategy to link its mail service with other widely-used services across the net. Which is merely stating the obvious. Xoopit is already integrated with Yahoo! Mail, along with apps that hook into services such as PayPal and Zumo.

Yesterday, Yahoo! also introduced a new home page that lets users tie straight into services such as eBay, Twitter, and Facebook.

For the past several months, as revenue waned amidst a soft economy, Yahoo! has worked to trim costs, laying off 10 per cent of its workforce last October, axing another 5 per cent in April, and shuttering various little-used services. But during yesterday's quarterly earnings call, CEO Carol Bartz and new CFO Tim Morse told the world that the company is now ready to spend. Bartz promised to put $75m into new hires, new tech, and Yahoo!-brand-flaunting marketing campaigns. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Spies, avert eyes! Tim Berners-Lee demands a UK digital bill of rights
Lobbies tetchy MPs 'to end indiscriminate online surveillance'
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.