Feeds

Toshiba tight-lipped on Blu-ray player plan

Keener on kiosk-sold downloads instead?

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Toshiba has poured cold water on claims that it's preparing to produce a Blu-ray Disc player this year. Well, sort of.

The one-time HD DVD cheerleader this week formally said that it was not able to comment on stories that it plans to release the BD player by the end of the year.

No great surprise, that - no one expected it would. Having had to gracefully accept the failure of its favoured format - Toshiba announced its withdrawal from HD DVD production in February 2008 - it's hardly going to admit to joining the rival team until it's ready to launch.

It's still open to question whether it will. Downloads may be its preferred option, which the statement-reading spokesman acknowledged: "We believe that [downloads are] a good alternative to packed media in the future.

"We cannot say when the time will be right in order to have the mass market ready for download but we have started investigating our options."

Indeed, Toshiba, you've been doing so for almost a year now, at least. In September 2008, Toshiba invested $20m in US digital content deliver specialist MOD Systems - it had already given MOD $4m at that point.

MOD focuses on providing retailers with kit to sell songs, videos, TV shows and movies through kiosks fed from its servers. Punters buy the shows they want in store, and the kiosks issue an SD card containing the downloads they've purchased.

Talk about movie downloads inevitably assumes streams are sent to the home. But while domestic broadband links in many countries - our own included - isn't up to 1080p HD downloads yet, sending the files to commercial download points is. Download kiosks could be the way forward in the short term, especially for punters who just want to watch the film and don't give two hoots for all the extras and interactive features the Blu-ray crowd like to laud.

MOD's system uses SD cards as the target for downloads. Interestingly, it was recently suggested that Apple might be bypassing Blu-ray Disc - Steve Jobs, for one, is not a fan - to offer HD on SD. To be fair, the evidence is flimsy: the rumour is predicated solely on the addition of SD card slots to Apple's MacBook Pro laptops. But it's a curious coincidence, no? ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Oi, Tim Cook. Apple Watch. I DARE you to tell me, IN PERSON, that it's secure
State attorney demands Apple CEO bows the knee to him
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Will BlackBerry make a comeback with its SQUARE smartphones?
Plus PC PIMs from company formerly known as RIM
Apple's iPhone 6 first-day sales are MEANINGLESS, mutters analyst
Big weekend queues only represent fruity firm's supply
Hey, Mac fanbois. HGST wants you drooling over its HUGE desktop RACK
What vast digital media repository could possibly need 64 TERABYTES?
Soundbites: News in brief from the Wi-Fi audiophile files
DTS and Sonos sing out but not off the same hymnsheet
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.