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Juniper wraps remote types in security blanket

Measures self with Cisco yardstick

Website security in corporate America

Juniper has stretched its enterprise security mechanisms to better protect all those machines logging into corporate networks from remote locations.

Dubbed Juniper Networks Adaptive Threat Management Solutions, the new offering automatically deploys anti-malware and anti-spyware tools to remote clients tapping the network via VPN, while affording additional protection by way of an updated intrusion-prevention system (IPS). And in an effort to ensure that all this doesn't annoy your remote minions, the Cisco-battling network infrastructure outfit also provides a WAN acceleration client.

"In a distributed enterprise, the first thing we need to do is provide the same LAN-like performance to all locations," Juniper senior manager of solutions marketing Michael Rothschild tells The Reg. "Our WX client - our acceleration client - allows us to not only deploy the appropriate security to the client, but also provide the appropriate acceleration for the applications you need.

"And this is tuned for the distributed enterprise, where applications tend to suffer before you see them suffer at headquarters."

The company says its acceleration client provides a twelve-fold performance improvement on file transfers and a nine-fold boost on web apps "in commonly seen configurations." And as usual, Juniper has favorably compared its own offering to a similar setup from Cisco, claiming a two-fold lead in, yes, total cost of ownership.

The company also says that its IPS is seven times faster than Cisco's, promising 30Gbps performance.

Meanwhile, Juniper has updated its network access control setup, its security threat response manager, its network and security manager, and its SA series VPN. The deployment of anti-malware and anti-spyware tools is handled through Juniper's UAC (unified access control), now on version 3.1. ®

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

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