Feeds

File-sharer numbers dip, says survey

Bluetooth takes a chomp out of P2P

Boost IT visibility and business value

A survey has found a fall in use of unlicensed music file-sharing over 18 months in the UK.

Researchers found that the overall percentage of sharers had fallen from 22 per cent in December 2007, when the survey was last conducted, to 17 per cent. The biggest drop was in 14-18 year olds: 26 per cent said they shared once a month, compared to 42 per cent in the earlier survey.

Consultancy MusicAlly conducted the research with sister company The Leading Question, surveying over 1,000 people. MusicAlly's MD Paul Brindley told us more research was needed to find out where they were going, pointing to the rise in popularity of Bluetooth device-to-device transfers and instant messaging.

"More fans are regularly sharing burned CDs and bluetoothing tracks to each other than file-sharing tracks," says MusicAlly.

But there are other forms of instant gratification than acquiring a recording. An earlier MusicAlly survey, conducted in January, highlighted the importance of YouTube as a music source: 31 per cent of the yoof demographic listen to streaming music, compared to 18 per cent of the general population.

"Kids find services like YouTube much more convenient for checking out new music than filesharing," concludes Brindley.

That's inspired the major labels to bet big on streaming music, and they have invested significantly in Spotify, blessing the secretive outfit with equity and favoured-nation royalty deals.

The survey finds that "more UK music fans regularly buying single track downloads (19 per cent) than file sharing single tracks (17 per cent) every month, though the percentage of fans sharing albums regularly (13 per cent) remains higher than those purchasing digital albums (10 per cent)".

Two-thirds of people surveyed say they'd never shared music on the internet. ®

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

More from The Register

next story
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Sonos AXES support for Apple's iOS4 and 5
Want to use your iThing? You can't - it's too old
Philip K Dick 'Nazi alternate reality' story to be made into TV series
Amazon Studios, Ridley Scott firm to produce The Man in the High Castle
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
Too many IT conferences to cover? MICROSOFT to the RESCUE!
Yet more word of cuts emerges from Redmond
Joe Average isn't worth $10 a year to Mark Zuckerberg
The Social Network deflates the PC resurgence with mobile-only usage prediction
Chips are down at Broadcom: Thousands of workers laid off
Cellphone baseband device biz shuttered
Feel free to BONK on the TUBE, says Transport for London
Plus: Almost NOBODY uses pay-by-bonk on buses - Visa
Amazon says Hachette should lower ebook prices, pay authors more
Oh yeah ... and a 30% cut for Amazon to seal the deal
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.