Feeds

iPods get digicam rumor upgrade

'Everything but the Shuffle'

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Apple may soon add video-capture capability to its ubiquitous iPods, if rumors that surfaced Monday are to be believed.

According to a report from TechCrunch, "sources in Asia" say that Apple has placed a "massive" order for camera modules, an order so large that "Everything but the Shuffle may have a camera in it soon."

Of course, "camera" may mean either a still or video camera, but the addition of video could incite an upgrade-buying cycle that would reinvigorate sales of the iPod line, which many observers have opined is reaching a saturation point.

And if Apple makes it as easy for Wi-Fi equipped iPod owners as it is for iPhone 3GS users to trim, compress, and email videos or upload them to YouTube or MobileMe, a boatload of bulky personal videos are destined to wend their way over the internet.

But there appears to be no turning back on video crowding the intertubes. During a recent conference call explaining his company's new consumer-level strategy, Cisco SVP Ned Hooper said that "In three years time our carriers estimate that about 90 per cent of the traffic flowing through their infrastructure will be video."

Hooper also cited a company study that predicts that two-thirds of a zettabyte of data will cross the global network in 2013 - a zettabyte, by the way, is a trillion gigabytes.

If 90 percent of that data is video, most of it will be content being downloaded to settop boxes. However, Cisco's recent acquisition of Pure Digital, makers of the no-brainer Flip Mino HD digicam, plus the profusion of other pocket video shooters, indicates that the industry is betting that internet-enabled personal video sharing is The Next Big Thing.

Add millions of video-capturing and video-sharing iPods to that mix, and bandwidth pressures are sure to escalate - and quickly.

But that's not Apple's problem. Their goal is to sell product, and video-enabled iPod touches, nanos, and classics would put "good-enough" video-capture and upload capability into millions of pockets worldwide.

Less than four years ago, a "video iPod" meant a pocket music player that could also view video. Soon it might mean a pocket device that can not only support tunes, games, videos, photos, and apps, but that can also capture and share video clips.

And contribute to that aforementioned zettabyte of tube-clogging data. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
Consumers agree to give up first-born child for free Wi-Fi – survey
This Herod network's ace – but crap reception in bullrushes
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
New EU digi-commish struggles with concepts of net neutrality
Oettinger all about the infrastructure – but not big on substance
PEAK IPV4? Global IPv6 traffic is growing, DDoS dying, says Akamai
First time the cache network has seen drop in use of 32-bit-wide IP addresses
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.