Feeds

Speculation mounts over AVG plans for OS X client

'Mac users have no antibodies'

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

AVG bosses aren't saying much, but there's new evidence the anti-virus maker is seriously considering building an application for the Mac.

A job posting on the company's website seeks a senior software developer who is familiar with the OS X platform. Responsibilities for the full-time position include the following:

  • adjusting basic system architecture of the AVG product to Mac OS X conditions
  • portation of the AVG technologies to Mac OS X environment
  • cooperation on portation of the AVG product to Mac OS X together with the remote control team

It's by no means the first time there's been speculation that AVG would expand its offerings to the mushrooming base of Mac users. In 2006, ZDNet Australia reported AVG was working on an OS X version, but said it was unclear if it would ever make it out of development labs. In March, more than two years later, SC Magazine reported that AVG execs were still considering the move but remained unsure if a market for such a product even existed.

What remains clear is that the Mac is a bigger target now than it's ever been. Mac-specific trojans such as the RSPlug are updated several times a month and are growing increasingly sophisticated. Social engineering attacks that have plagued Windows users for years are also becoming increasingly common.

And events such as the Pwn2Own hacker contests for the past three years in a row have demonstrated that remote code execution on the platform is immanently eminently possible in the real world so long as there are financial incentives to carry them out.

Even Apple's own support pages advise that Mac users run anti-virus software, though you'd never know that from the smug Mac guy in Apple television commercials, who to this day portrays Windows as the exclusive domain of malware.

AVG Chief Research Officer Roger Thompson declined to discuss his company's plans for the Mac, but did repeat the oft-observed opinion that users are increasingly under siege.

"Mac users have no antibodies," he said. "As Macs gain in popularity, the bad guys will aim at them in greater numbers." ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Goog says patch⁵⁰ your Chrome
64-bit browser loads cat vids FIFTEEN PERCENT faster!
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
Chinese hackers spied on investigators of Flight MH370 - report
Classified data on flight's disappearance pinched
NIST to sysadmins: clean up your SSH mess
Too many keys, too badly managed
Attack flogged through shiny-clicky social media buttons
66,000 users popped by malicious Flash fudging add-on
Think crypto hides you from spooks on Facebook? THINK AGAIN
Traffic fingerprints reveal all, say boffins
prev story

Whitepapers

A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Maximize storage efficiency across the enterprise
The HP StoreOnce backup solution offers highly flexible, centrally managed, and highly efficient data protection for any enterprise.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.