Feeds

Masked passwords must go

'Shoulder surfing is largely a phantom problem'

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Websites should stop masking passwords as users type because it does not improve security and makes websites harder to use, according to two of the technology world's leading thinkers.

Usability expert Jakob Nielsen and security expert Bruce Schneier both think websites should stop blanking out passwords as users type them in. They say the practice inconveniences users and delivers no security benefits.

Most websites that require passwords allow a user to see the login name as it is typed in but replace the password with dots or asterisks as it is typed, so that the password cannot be viewed either by another person looking at the screen or by the user.

"It's time to show most passwords in clear text as users type them," said Nielsen in a post on his website. "Providing feedback and visualizing the system's status have always been among the most basic usability principles. Showing undifferentiated bullets while users enter complex codes definitely fails to comply."

Nielsen is the web's most famous usability guru and campaigns for content and websites to conform to technical standards to be usable and accessible for all users, including disabled users using assistive technologies.

Schneier, a renowned IT security expert, echoed Nielsen's concerns, and supported Nielsen's assertion that password masking does nothing to improve security.

"Password masking has annoyed me for years," Schneier told OUT-LAW.COM. "Shoulder surfing is largely a phantom problem, and people know to be alert when others are nearby, but mistyping a long password happens all the time."

Double degradation

Nielsen said that research had shown that password masking causes problems for users. "Password masking has proven to be a particularly nasty usability problem in our testing of mobile devices, where typing is difficult and typos are common. But the problem exists for desktop users as well," he said.

Preventing users from seeing the passwords they type in causes two problems, according to Nielsen. "Users make more errors when they can't see what they're typing while filling in a form. They therefore feel less confident. This double degradation of the user experience means that people are more likely to give up and never log in to your site at all, leading to lost business," he said.

"The more uncertain users feel about typing passwords, the more likely they are to (a) employ overly simple passwords and/or (b) copy-paste passwords from a file on their computer. Both behaviors lead to a true loss of security," he said.

Schneier agreed that masking passwords was likely to result in a weakening of security. "I'm sure people choose shorter and easier to type password when their typing is masked, resulting in less security overall," he said.

Nielsen said that sites usually blank out type-in passwords out of force of habit rather than reason. "Password masking has become common for no reasons other than (a) it's easy to do, and (b) it was the default in the web's early days," he said.

He acknowledged that shoulder surfing is a risk in some environments, such as internet cafés. "It's therefore worth offering them a checkbox to have their passwords masked; for high-risk applications, such as bank accounts, you might even check this box by default," he suggests. "In cases where there's a tension between security and usability, sometimes security should win."

See also
Nielsen's Alertbox on password masking
Bruce Schneier's blog

Copyright © 2009, OUT-LAW.com

OUT-LAW.COM is part of international law firm Pinsent Masons.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
One HUNDRED FAMOUS LADIES exposed NUDE online
Celebrity women victimised as Apple iCloud accounts reportedly popped
Rubbish WPS config sees WiFi router keys popped in seconds
Another day, another way in to your home router
Goog says patch⁵⁰ your Chrome
64-bit browser loads cat vids FIFTEEN PERCENT faster!
NZ Justice Minister scalped as hacker leaks emails
Grab your popcorn: Subterfuge and slur disrupts election run up
HP: NORKS' cyber spying efforts actually a credible cyberthreat
'Sophisticated' spies, DIY tech and a TROLL ARMY – report
NIST to sysadmins: clean up your SSH mess
Too many keys, too badly managed
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
Attack flogged through shiny-clicky social media buttons
66,000 users popped by malicious Flash fudging add-on
New Snowden leak: How NSA shared 850-billion-plus metadata records
'Federated search' spaffed info all over Five Eyes chums
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.