Feeds

NASA reacquires original Moon landing footage

Tapes discovered in Oz, agency confirms

New hybrid storage solutions

NASA has seemingly confirmed that the original taped recordings of the first Moon landing have turned up in Australia - almost three years after the agency admitted it had carelessly mislaid them.

The Parkes Observatory in Australia captured the 1969 live images straight from the lunar surface to magnetic tape. What the US public saw, though was a compressed feed "downsized" to local TV resolutions, while NASA itself grabbed a 16mm copy from a TV monitor.

The Parkes Observatory tapes were apparently shipped to the Goddard Space Flight Centre in Maryland a year after the landing, but in 2006 NASA confirmed that despite an extensive search, their whereabouts was unknown.

However, the Sunday Express now claims the footage was actually gathering dust in a storage facility in Perth among other tapes containing Moon dust data - presumably the same material which Oz scientists hoped to run through a vintage IBM 729 Mark V tape drive earlier this year.

A NASA spokesman confirmed the Apollo 11 landing recordings are the real deal, and said: "We’re talking about the same tapes."

He added: “At this point, I’m not prepared to discuss what has or has not been found. The research team is preparing its final report and we’ll release those findings publicly in the coming weeks.”

The Sunday Express notes that "if the visual data can be retrieved, NASA is set to reveal them to the world as a key plank of celebrations to mark the 40th anniversary of the landings next month".

Whether the world will finally enjoy high-quality pics of Aldrin and Armstrong strolling the Moon's surface remains to be seen. When NASA coughed to having lost the original tapes, John Sarkissian of the Parkes Observatory noted that even if a machine could be found to replay them, they would be "so old and fragile, it's not certain they could even be played". ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Thought that last dinosaur was BIG? This one's bloody ENORMOUS
Weighed several adult elephants, contend boffins
Chelyabinsk-sized SURPRISE asteroid to skim Earth, satnav birds
Space rock appears out of nowhere, buzzes planet on Sunday
City hidden beneath England's Stonehenge had HUMAN ABATTOIR. And a pub
Boozed-up ancients drank beer before tearing corpses apart
'Duck face' selfie in SPAAAACE: Rosetta's snap with bird comet
Probe prepares to make first landing on fast-moving rock
Square Kilometre Array reveals its 1.6TB-a-day storage and network rigs
Boolardy Engineering Test Array - aka BETA - is about to come out of Beta
LOHAN invites ENTIRE REG READERSHIP to New Mexico shindig
Well, those of you who back our Kickstarter tin-rattling...
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.