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Defunct American airport security lane service Clear said on Friday it may sell its sensitive customer data to a similar provider if it's authorized to do so by the US government.

Before Monday, the Clear program promised to rush customers paying $200 per year through the diabolical gauntlet that is America's airport security checkpoints.

When Clear abruptly shut down operations, its quarter million customers that handed over private data like fingerprints, employment history, social security number, and credit information to get cutsies in line began wondering what happens to all the sensitive information. Government officials are also wondering.

In a statement on its website today, Verified Identity Pass, which runs Clear, said its airport kiosks are now being wiped clean of all data and software.

Computers that Verified Identity Pass assigned to its former employees are being wiped clean too, the company said.

But not all information is being deleted while Clear is read its last rites. The company adds that its customers' personally identifiable information could still be used by a similar provider, presumably if Clear's assets are sold later on.

"Any new service provider would need to maintain personally identifiable information in accordance with the Transportation Security Administration's privacy and security requirements for Registered Traveler programs," it stated. "If the information is not used for a Registered Traveler program, it will be deleted."

Clear says it's now "communicating" with the TSA, airports, and airline sponsors to ensure the security of the information and systems is maintained throughout the process.

The company said at the present time, Verified Identity Pass hasn't filed for bankruptcy. It blamed its abrupt end on failing to negotiate an agreement with its senior creditor and further affirmed it won't issue refunds to customers.

Clear said it will notify members in a "final email message" when the information is deleted. No mention if the same courtesy will be extended if they don't. ®

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