Feeds

Titsup airport express lane biz may pawn flyer data

If the feds Clear it

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Defunct American airport security lane service Clear said on Friday it may sell its sensitive customer data to a similar provider if it's authorized to do so by the US government.

Before Monday, the Clear program promised to rush customers paying $200 per year through the diabolical gauntlet that is America's airport security checkpoints.

When Clear abruptly shut down operations, its quarter million customers that handed over private data like fingerprints, employment history, social security number, and credit information to get cutsies in line began wondering what happens to all the sensitive information. Government officials are also wondering.

In a statement on its website today, Verified Identity Pass, which runs Clear, said its airport kiosks are now being wiped clean of all data and software.

Computers that Verified Identity Pass assigned to its former employees are being wiped clean too, the company said.

But not all information is being deleted while Clear is read its last rites. The company adds that its customers' personally identifiable information could still be used by a similar provider, presumably if Clear's assets are sold later on.

"Any new service provider would need to maintain personally identifiable information in accordance with the Transportation Security Administration's privacy and security requirements for Registered Traveler programs," it stated. "If the information is not used for a Registered Traveler program, it will be deleted."

Clear says it's now "communicating" with the TSA, airports, and airline sponsors to ensure the security of the information and systems is maintained throughout the process.

The company said at the present time, Verified Identity Pass hasn't filed for bankruptcy. It blamed its abrupt end on failing to negotiate an agreement with its senior creditor and further affirmed it won't issue refunds to customers.

Clear said it will notify members in a "final email message" when the information is deleted. No mention if the same courtesy will be extended if they don't. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Webcam hacker pervs in MASS HOME INVASION
You thought you were all alone? Nope – change your password, says ICO
You really need to do some tech support for Aunty Agnes
Free anti-virus software, expires, stops updating and p0wns the world
USB coding anarchy: Consider all sticks licked
Thumb drive design ruled by almighty buck
Attack reveals 81 percent of Tor users but admins call for calm
Cisco Netflow a handy tool for cheapskate attackers
Privacy bods offer GOV SPY VICTIMS a FREE SPYWARE SNIFFER
Looks for gov malware that evades most antivirus
Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins
Vulnerability promotes lusers to domain overlords ... oops
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Getting ahead of the compliance curve
Learn about new services that make it easy to discover and manage certificates across the enterprise and how to get ahead of the compliance curve.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.