Feeds
80%
HTC Touch Pro2

HTC Touch Pro2

The Windows Mobile iPhone antidote?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Review We were expecting the HTC Touch Pro2 to emerge around the same time as its cousin the Diamond2 back in April, but it looks like the wait has done the Pro2 good. Not least of its charms is a new version of HTC's TouchFLO 3D interface, which further relegates Windows Mobile to the background, but there's also a slide-out Qwerty keyboard, tilting touch screen, A-GPS, WiFi and an emphasis on conference calling.

HTC Touch Pro2

HTC's Touch Pro2

For all the good things it has packed inside, the HTC Touch Pro2 has one serious drawback. It's a brick at 116x59x17mm and 179g. This is certainly a very hefty handset, and we suspect that many will be put off by its sheer bulk. But that would be a pity, because it has plenty to offer business professionals and mobile media fans alike.

Its size is at least moderated by its slanted sides with chrome trim, which offers a more stylish cast than the original, blocky Pro. The sides are almost bare, with just a volume rocker and stylus to break up the smooth lines, plus power button and power/headphone slot on top and bottom. There's little to break up the fascia either, with just a line of four hard buttons beneath the 3.6in touch screen: call start and stop (which doubles as a home key), Windows and back.

The Touch Pro2 features 512MB of ROM with 288MB of onboard storage. There's a microSD card slot under the cover and you don't need to remove the battery to get to it either. Although there's none supplied, it can handle cards up to 32GB.

The Qwerty keyboard slides out to reveal five rows of well-spaced, backlit buttons – it's a joy to use. The keys are big enough to be easily located under the thumbs, have a pleasantly tactile rubberised plastic feel and make a reassuring click when pressed.

HTC Touch Pro2

Key feature: well-spaced buttons make typing easy

The 3.6in, 480x800 WVGA touch screen can be viewed flat, or tilted upwards to an angle of about 45 degrees. So, if you prefer, you can rest it on a tabletop and use your fingers as if it were a laptop. Tilting also shifts the phone's centre of gravity, so it's a little easier to hold in the hands for long periods. The screen is nicely responsive to the touch, easily distinguishing between presses and swipes, and gives a gentle burr of haptic feedback when you access functions.

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
All aboard the Poo Bus! Ding ding, route Number Two departing
Only another three days of pooing and I can have a ride!
Ford's B-Max: Fiesta-based runaround that goes THUNK
... when you close the slidey doors, that is ...
Official: European members prefer to fondle Apple iPads
Only 7 of 50 parliamentarians plump for Samsung Galaxy S
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Space Commanders rebel as Elite:Dangerous kills offline mode
Frontier cops an epic kicking in its own forums ahead of December revival
Nexus 7 fandroids tell of salty taste after sucking on Google's Lollipop
Web giant looking into why version 5.0 of Android is crippling older slabs
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Getting ahead of the compliance curve
Learn about new services that make it easy to discover and manage certificates across the enterprise and how to get ahead of the compliance curve.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.