Feeds

Microsoft goes green to win IE 8 and Bing users

Revives failed 'facts' thinking

High performance access to file storage

The planet and economy have been co-opted by Microsoft in its latest effort to win back the web from open-source and Google.

Microsoft has announced a $10,000 prize for developers that build what it calls "economy or ecology" themed web applications in its Will Code for Green challenge.

All applications must consume Bing and conform to the Bing APis, Microsoft has said. You can read the fine print here.

Developers must say how their application will either help people deal with the worsening global economy or help to improve the ecology of the planet. Winners will be selected at Gnomedex in August.

The green and "aware" web apps campaign mirrors a similar charitable attempt to boost adoption of Internet Explorer 8, released in March.

Microsoft's Browser for the Better campaign, unveiled earlier this month, will see the software giant donate to a network of US food banks the financial equivalent of eight meals for every completed download of IE 8. The campaign runs until August 8

Behind every philanthropic effort lies cash, and Microsoft's charity underscores an emerging strategy of buying developers and end-users back from Google, Firefox, and Safari.

Microsoft launched its Live Search cashback program in May 2008, giving up to 35 per cent back to online shoppers who made purchases via Bing's predecessor. Now it's known as Bing cashback, with Microsoft offering up to 25 per cent back through a list of retailers, here.

Last week, Microsoft Australia unveiled a $10,0000 inducement for end-users to dump Firefox for IE8. The $10,000 comes in the form of an online prize that you can only find, according to Microsoft, by uncovering clues optimized to the latest version of Microsoft's browser.

Meanwhile, Microsoft has returned to a controversial set of tactics that it abandoned six years ago for lacking credibility. Microsoft last week published a feature chart comparing IE 8, Firefox, and Chrome, calling it called Windows Internet Explorer 8: Get the facts.

Microsoft last used the "get the facts" tag on an anti-Linux site it killed in 2003, before replacing the site with a Windows Server "compare" site. It was a tag line Microsoft's told us recently it didn't find constructive in its dealings with the open-source community.

That message doesn't seem to have reached IE's marketing team. Or if it did, the team simply didn't care.

According to Microsoft, the "facts" show IE 8 beats Firefox 3.0 and Chrome 2.0 in a number of areas and features. But some are things only Microsoft could have won because they are Microsoft-specific - such as InPrivate Browsing, Accelerators, and Web Slices.

In other categories, Microsoft has made IE 8 claims so broad that they're meaningless. These include the notions that IE 8 has the "most comprehensive developer tools built in" and that "neither Firefox nor Chrome provide guidance or enterprise tools." ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Windows 8.1, which you probably haven't upgraded to yet, ALREADY OBSOLETE
Pre-Update versions of new Windows version will no longer support patches
Android engineer: We DIDN'T copy Apple OR follow Samsung's orders
Veep testifies for Samsung during Apple patent trial
OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts
Bloke behind the cockup says not enough people are helping crucial crypto project
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS
Nearly 50% have NEVER tweeted a word
Windows XP still has 27 per cent market share on its deathbed
Windows 7 making some gains on XP Death Day
Internet-of-stuff startup dumps NoSQL for ... SQL?
NoSQL taste great at first but lacks proper nutrients, says startup cloud whiz
US taxman blows Win XP deadline, must now spend millions on custom support
Gov't IT likened to 'a Model T with a lot of things on top of it'
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.