Feeds

ITU calls for cooperation in keeping kids safe online

Unhysterical guidelines for kids, parents and industry

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

The International Telecommunications Union has issued draft guidelines to help keep kids safe online.

We're not sure how many children will wade through the 66 page pdf offering advice for kids online, but its basic message is sensible. Using the acronym 'SMART' kids are advised to:

Set your limits - use privacy settings, be careful what information you share, be critical of what you see online and do not accept bullying as part of normal behaviour online.

Meeting online friends in real life - think twice before you do it and take someone with you.

Accepting invitations - most online contacts are probably someone you already knew in real life - be wary of accepting invitations to chat from other people.

React - ignore bad behaviour and leave conversations or websites which are inappropriate, block anyone who is unpleasant to you and tell an adult if a stranger tries to talk to you about sex.

Tell someone - if you're worried about something that has happened online, tell an adult you trust. You can also report content to internet watchdogs or the police.

Kids are also advised to look after the health of their computer to use anti-virus software and not open unknown files.

The technology industry is urged to work together to keep kids safe. The ITU wants common rules and standards to be developed by firms working in similar areas. It calls for clear sign-posting of material not suitable for everyone. The ITU uses BBC iPlayer as an example - it has the option to PIN protect content which carries a 'G' (Guidance) label.

Members of the public have until 30 June to respond to the draft guidelines for kids, parents, industry and policy makers. The guidelines will then be presented at the ITU meeting in Geneva in October.

The ITU child protection strategy page is here. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Spies, avert eyes! Tim Berners-Lee demands a UK digital bill of rights
Lobbies tetchy MPs 'to end indiscriminate online surveillance'
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.