Feeds

HP sees techies living in a box

POD bay doors thrown open

3 Big data security analytics techniques

HP has revealed its own POD containerised data centre at its Technology Forum in Las Vegas.

The POD acronym stands for Performance-Optimised Datacentre and, like several other companies, HP has decided to follow in Sun's Project Blackbox footsteps and build data centres in shipping containers.

HP POD

HP says it can be built and delivered, ready for use, in six weeks - which compares favourably to the months or years required for a new data centre suite or building.

Natch it's filled to the hilt with networked servers and storage. It is also positioned as being energy-efficient, cheaper and faster to implement than a building - as local authorities don't have to okay a new permanent structure - and even tax-efficient, as such structures can attract lower property taxes.

The specs say that the 40-foot container can house up to 3,520 compute nodes (blade servers) - 5,000 if you use the new SL servers - and 12,000 3.5-inch hard drives, or any combination, which HP claims to be the equivalent of a 4,000 sq ft data centre. Third-party blade servers can be used. PODs can be stacked two high.

The PODs, costing about $1.4m, are built in Houston and shipped worldwide. HP is envisaging setting up regional assembly centres and developing a POD lease offering. If you want to open the POD bay doors and look inside, then get more information here. ®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.