Feeds
65%
BlockMaster SafeStick

BlockMaster SafeStick hardware-encrypted USB drive

Tough enough?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

With a password in place, you're ready to add files to the stick. BlockMaster offers versions of SafeStick with as little as 1GB of storage or as much as 64GB, though the latter's slightly larger than the weeny 56 x 18 x 6mm 32GB model we tested. It weighs 9g and edge on takes up barely more space than the USB port itself.

BlockMaster SafeStick

The on-board access app is straightforward

The drive is wrapped in a metal shell. There's the customary lanyard in the box, which attaches to a loop the end of the SafeStick. BlockMaster missed a trick here: the loop is made of plastic but should have been formed from the same metal that makes up the case. It'd be rather less likely to break then.

BlockMaster SafeStick

There's a Mac version too, but Linux support is some way off

The metal shell affords more protection than your average USB Flash drive provides, but it's not as solid not as all-encompassing as the one on, say, the IronKey, though that makes it lighter and smaller. The IronKey's sealed-in design would prove a real challenge for anyone attempting to open up the drive and extract the chips. We're not sure we can say the same for the SafeStick.

Within the stick, alongside the storage formed from what BlockMaster claims is the "highest quality NAND Dlash available on the market", is an Intel 8051 encryption chip. This automatically encrypts data on the drive using 256-bit AES.

BlockMaster SafeStick

Auto-lock your storage if it's not being used

Trying the SafeStick out on an Acer Aspire One running Windows 7 RC1, we were able to access the drive's contents in seconds. It wasn't so quick with a freshly installed Mac OS X version of the access app - which also lacks the reset, lock-out timer control and password change facilities of the Windows version - but not unusably slow by any means. There's no Linux version now, alas, but BlockMaster's looking to have code out by the end of the year.

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Next page: Verdict

More from The Register

next story
4K-ing excellent TV is on its way ... in its own sweet time, natch
For decades Hollywood actually binned its 4K files. Doh!
Oi, Tim Cook. Apple Watch. I DARE you to tell me, IN PERSON, that it's secure
State attorney demands Apple CEO bows the knee to him
Apple's big bang: iPhone 6, ANOTHER iPhone 6 Plus and WATCH OUT
Let's >sigh< see what Cupertino has been up to for the past year
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Apple's SNEAKY plan: COPY ANDROID. Hello iPhone 6, Watch
Sizes, prices and all – but not for the wrist-o-puter
DARPA-backed jetpack prototype built to make soldiers run faster
4 Minute Mile project hatched to speed up tired troops
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.