Feeds

Intel to play hi-lo in 2009

New Celerons, Core i7 on the way

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Rumor has it that Intel will beef up both the bottom and top of its desktop-processor lines in the second half of this year with the release of new Celeron and Core i7 processors.

According to a report by the market-watchers at Taiwan's DigiTimes, the Celeron E1000 series will be retired and replaced by in the third quarter of this year by a new series, the E3000.

The first two chips in this series, the Celeron E3200 and E3300, will retain the 800MHz frontside buses and 65-watt TDPs of the current E1000 series, which includes the 1.6GHz E1200, 2.0GHz E1400, 2.2GHz E1500 (for the embedded market), and 2.4GHz E1600.

According to DigiTime's loose-lipped "sources at motherboard makers," the E3200 and E3300 will clock in at 2.4GHz and 2.5GHz, respectively, and double the E1000 series' L2 cache to 1MB.

In addition, the sources report that the new Celerons will support Intel's VT virtualization technology - which, if true, would be a first at this low level of the processor spectrum.

We wouldn't expect prices of the new E3100-series chips to stray much from those of the E1000s, which hover in the mid-$100 range.

At the other end of the desktop-processor spectrum, according to those sources, will be a new Core i7 processor, the 3.2GHz i7-960, rumored to launch in the fourth quarter of this year.

Presumably, this new part won't join the thousand-dollar-and-up Core i7 Extreme Edition family, which now includes the 3.2Ghz i7-965 and the recently released 3.33GHz i7-975, but will instead join the current i7-900 series, which currently includes the overclocker's favorite, the bargain-priced 2.66GHz i7-920, plus the 2.93GHz i7-940 and and 3.06GHz i7-950.

Rounding out today's rumors are a dual-core Atom D510, said to launch in the fourth quarter of this year and to be targeted at nettops, and a single-core Atom D410 to be released in the first quarter of next year.

We asked Intel for their opinion of these rumors, but - true to form - they graciously declined our request, saying only that the company doesn't comment on rumor and speculation. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Chipmaker FTDI bricking counterfeit kit
USB-serial imitators whacked by driver update
Xperia Z3: Crikey, Sony – ANOTHER flagship phondleslab?
The Fourth Amendment... and it IS better
DOUBLE BONK: Testy fanbois catch Apple Pay picking pockets
Users wail as tapcash transactions are duplicated
Microsoft to enter the STRUGGLE of the HUMAN WRIST
It's not just a thumb war, it's total digit war
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.