Feeds
85%
O2 Joggler

O2 Joggler family organiser

More PMP than parental PDA

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

The Joggler's connection ports reflect the fact that it is aimed at the technically illiterate. All you get is an Ethernet port, 3.5mm audio out, power socket and a USB port. The USB port is simply for plugging in media loaded onto memory sticks and not for hooking up the Joggler to a PC. When we tried to connect the Joggler to a Windows PC, it didn't even appear as a USB storage device. One thing we would have liked to see is an SD card slot – having a USB stick dangling out of the side is not particularly elegant.

O2 Joggler

Handles most content and replays streaming media

The two small stereo speakers at the back of the Joggler sound tinny, sharp and generally unpleasant. They just about suffice for watching a movie, but you wouldn't want to listen to music through them for any length of time and we suspect most users will connect their Joggler to some powered speakers via the 3.5mm socket.

The Joggler's capacitive screen supports a very good touch interface. That's not good as in 'good but not Apple good', but good – period. Commands can only be imputed by taps, rather than swipes or multi-touch gestures, but both the reaction time and sensitivity are excellent, as is the virtual keyboard design. The UI's performance is helped by the fact that the Joggler's Linux-based operating system is powered by a pretty manly chip – an Intel Atom clocked at 1.1Ghz, to be exact.

In the absence of a comprehensive spec sheet we tried an assemblage of media files on the Joggler and found that it supports MP3, WMA, Ogg Vorbis and WAV audio files though not FLAC or AAC. On the video front we had luck with WMV, H.264, MPEG-4 and Xvid/DivX files, along with JPEG images. The Joggler can cope with video resolutions well beyond its native screen resolution - while it struggled with a 1080i DivX file, a 1280x720 example played faultlessly, as did 960x720 H.264 and WMV files.

As far as video playback is concerned the Joggler is right up there alongside the Archos 7 in terms of clarity, colour and definition. While it may lack many of the finer settings and tweaks you find on dedicated PMPs, it nevertheless managed to play every video we tried in the correct aspect ratio with a simple tap taking the image to full screen.

O2 Joggler

The fridge magnet alternative

Though we can't prove it, from the looks of things we suspect that the screen supports a 16m colour palette. Sadly there's no DRM support though, so you won't be able to watch your iPlayer downloads.

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Turnbull: NBN won't turn your town into Silicon Valley
'People have been brainwashed to believe that their world will be changed forever if they get FTTP'
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
ISPs' post-net-neutrality world is built on 'bribes' says Tim Berners-Lee
Father of the worldwide web is extremely peeved over pay-per-packet-type plans
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.