Feeds

AMD cooking up low-power, twin server

Making Istanbul cool(er)

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

Meet the twins

First, it will be a so-called "twin" server design, which will put two half-width motherboards side-by-side in a single chassis; presumably each board has two processor sockets. IF AMD's Kroner design follows what is happening with the dense systems based on Intel's "Nehalem EP" Xeon 5500 processors (such as Hewlett-Packard designs here and here or Super Micro designs here), then Kroner will probably put two or four physical servers on trays inside a 2U rack-mounted chassis and let customers choose different disk options depending on how many servers they put in the chassis.

The Kroner low-power server will also not support 75-watt standard Opteron parts or 105-watt Special Edition (SE) parts, which run a little faster and a lot hotter, according to Kerby, who would not confirm if the Kroner design will support both 40-watt Extremely Efficient (EE) and 55-watt Highly Efficient parts, or if the platform would be restricted to Istanbul chips. There is no technical reason why Shanghai Opterons can't plug in. The Istanbul EE, HE, and SE parts are not expected to start shipping until the third quarter, so Kroner could be waiting for these. But if AMD wants to push Shanghais in Kroner platforms, it doesn't have to wait.

Last year, the roadmaps for the Maranello and San Marino platforms were highlighting a technology called APML remote power management, which allows for the remote monitoring and control of the power states of the Opteron processors, and guess what, it is already in the Istanbul chips. What APML will do is allow system administrators to set power caps on servers remotely, presumably through their normal system management tools, without having to go into the BIOS of each server. This APML technology is being emphasized in the Kroner platform. The emphasis on APML suggests that Kroner will focus on Istanbul chips.

The Kroner servers will also sport voltage regulator modules on the motherboards that are precisely sized to the processors used on the boards. These regulators consume power and they have to be sized to span the full range of Opteron processors in a generic motherboard.

Every single watt counts at these hyperscale customers, and Kroner aims to squeeze as many of them out of the system as can be done. It will be up to the system makers, who are all clamoring for a spot at the bargaining table among these hyperscale data centers, to create systems to use the Kroner design.

Kerby would not comment on the ODMs and OEMs who helped drive the Kroner design and who might be picking it up for future products. ®

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

More from The Register

next story
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
FLAPE – the next BIG THING in storage
Find cold data with flash, transmit it from tape
Seagate chances ARM with NAS boxes for the SOHO crowd
There's an Atom-powered offering, too
Intel teaches Oracle how to become the latest and greatest Xeon Whisperer
E7-8895 v2 chips are best of the bunch, and with firmware-unlocked speed control
Gartner: To the right, to the right – biz sync firms who've won in a box to the right...
Magic quadrant: Top marks for, er, completeness of vision, EMC
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.