Feeds

HP serves up cookie sheet servers

The lighter way to enjoy data

Security for virtualized datacentres

Saving here, saving there

The first SL6000 server node is the SL160z, which is a server tray that takes up 1U of space horizontally in the z6000 chassis and which includes one server node that has 18 DDR3 memory slots to support the maximum of 144 GB of memory available for Nehalem EP servers using Intel's "Tylersburg" 5520 chipset. (Cisco Systems, as you know, will this month ship blade servers based on the Nehalem EPs that have a homegrown memory expansion ASIC that boosts capacity to 384 GB for a two-socket blade.)

The SL160z has room for two 3.5-inch SATA or SAS disks. The SL170 uses a half-width motherboard that has its memory crimped back to 16 slots (for 128 GB max) and room for six 3.5-inch disks on that 1U tray. The SL2x170 server tray has two half-width Nehalem EP server nodes, each with up to 128 GB of memory and one 3.5-inch disk. As you can see, hyperscale customers don't seem to be all that interested in the power savings that come from 2.5-inch SATA or SAS disks, or else HP would be putting them in the ProLiant SL server nodes. (This strikes me as odd, but these customers are probably more interested in raw capacity, dollars per I/O, and dollars per GB than anything else when it comes to local disk storage on their server nodes.)

Gromala would not comment on when or if HP might deliver ProLiant SL machines based on Advanced Micro Devices Opteron line of processors, but it seems likely that it will eventually do this, particularly if the Opterons can demonstrate performance or price/performance benefits compared to Nehalem boxes.

All of these ProLiant SL machines will be available in July; pricing for individual parts of the boxes has not yet been announced.

By HP's math, the shift from standard rack servers to the SL iron can result in significant savings. Gromala did some calculations on the back of an envelope for a 100,000 square foot data center and reckons that 88,032 server nodes could be crammed into that space putting four SL nodes in a z6000 chassis and putting 1,048 racks into that space. By going dense and using the SL nodes, HP reckons a hyperscale data center operator could save $14.5m on server acquisition costs.

Those servers would use 170 megawatt-hours per year less of electricity thanks to the shared power and cooling inside the z6000 chassis, and that translates into another $13m in savings. And in terms of weight savings, using the SL designs means chopping out 838.5 tons (US, not metric) of weight, which adds up on the shipping bill and which means data centers can be a little less rugged. This saves money, too.

As usual, HP has a slew of polysyllabic services that go along with the new iron, such as the Data Center Environmental Edge collection of services for implementing the HP Extreme Scale-Out (ExSO) portfolio. Basically, HP will be recommending that customers deploy DL1000 or SL6000 machines to boost density or save money, or both. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Docker's app containers are coming to Windows Server, says Microsoft
MS chases app deployment speeds already enjoyed by Linux devs
IBM storage revenues sink: 'We are disappointed,' says CEO
Time to put the storage biz up for sale?
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
Symantec backs out of Backup Exec: Plans to can appliance in Jan
Will still provide support to existing customers
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.