Feeds
60%
Orange Vegas

Orange Vegas

Less Elvis, more Johnny?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Review Would you take a punt on a sub-£50 touchscreen phone? With a wallet-soothing price but few must-have features, Orange’s own-brand Vegas plays a very different hand to most high-rolling touch-operated devices currently available.

Orange Vegas

Orange's Vegas: budget touchscreen

There are no iPhone-alike pretensions here, as you might guess from a phone that sells for £49 on pay-as-you-go. Instead, the Vegas goes for a budget-chic approach, with a compact design based around a small, 2.4in, 320 x 240 touchscreen.

All that cash-squeezing is reflected in a modest features rundown. The Vegas covers the essentials for an entry-level handset - music player, FM radio and camera – but offers none of the punch that some might crave in a touchscreen phone. There’s no 3G, for instance, and the camera is a low-grade 1.3Mp job.

The Vegas isn’t only the cheapest touchscreen phone in town, it’s also the smallest and lightest to hit the UK, measuring in at 93 x 53 x 16 and weighing 84g. Bucking the current trend, its compact design – built by Chinese handset maker ZTE – is less like a mini-iPhone and more like a shrunken Windows Mobile device.

Available in either black and edged in chrome, it’s attractive enough for a budget phone, and feels solid in-hand. It's also available in pink.

While the Orange Vegas is touchscreen-based, its physical controls offer users an alternative, more conventional way of navigating their way around the phone’s functions. For the most part, many of the menus and features can be accessed and operated without having to press at the touchscreen at all – although without a physical numberpad, texting and dialing do depend on on-screen tapping.

Orange Vegas

The mini USB port takes the earphones too

There’s little in the menu navigation set-up to throw newcomers. The Vegas has its own proprietary OS and UI, which aren’t particularly sophisticated or confusing. For long menu lists, like contacts, you can easily scroll down with a finger stroke, or tap in text to search. It’s far from iPhone-slick, but it does the job functionally.

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Virgin Media so, so SORRY for turning spam fire-hose on its punters
Hundreds of emails flood inboxes thanks to gaffe
AT&T dangles gigabit broadband plans over 100 US cities
So soon after a mulled Google Fiber expansion, fancy that
AT&T threatens to pull out of FCC wireless auctions over purchase limits
Company wants ability to buy more spectrum space in auction
EE & Vodafone will let you BONK on the TUBE – with Boris' blessing
Transport for London: You can pay, but don't touch
NBN Co in 'broadband kit we tested worked' STUNNER
Announcement of VDSL trial is not proof of concept for fibre-to-the-node
Google eyes business service in latest Fiber trials
Lucky Kansas City buggers to host yet another pilot program
Huawei exec: 'Word of mouth' will beat Apple and Samsung in Europe
World Mobile Telephone Factory No.3 won't fling the big bucks around just yet
Brazilian president signs internet civil rights law
Marco Civil bill enshines 'net neutrality', 'privacy' as law
DeSENSORtised: Why the 'Internet of Things' will FAIL without IPv6
What's stopping a tinyputer invasion? An IP address shortage, says Cisco
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.