Feeds

Best Buy leaked memo spills Windows 7 upgrade details

Move along from Vista, people. Nothing to see here

The essential guide to IT transformation

A leaked memo has revealed that Best Buy will begin pre-selling Microsoft’s Windows 7 operating system on 26 June in the US.

The retailer confirmed late last week the date people can start buying Vista-based computers and subsequently qualify for a free upgrade to Windows 7, when it lands in October.

Engadget has published a copy of the memo here. It outlines prices for upgrade versions of Windows 7 Home Premium ($49) and Windows 7 Professional ($99), both of which will be available via the Best Buy website.

It looks as though the prices listed may in fact be promotional offers, as according to the memo the program will only run for 16 days.

“Microsoft is launching Windows 7 in mid-October 2009. This new operating system isn't just a ‘Vista that works’ program — it’s a new operating system with improved productivity, functionality and creativity that uses less computer resources,” opined Best Buy, which seems happy to note what a big fat failure Vista has been since its lead balloon launch in 2006.

Meanwhile, Microsoft has confirmed to The Register that it has no plans to slap Vista Capable-style stickers on machines worthy of an upgrade from the unloved OS to Windows 7.

The company has ditched those marketing tactics after a heap of bad publicity and a lengthy lawsuit that continues to limp along in the US.

Microsoft said in an official blog post last week that it was readying its Windows 7 upgrade option program, but didn’t spill any further information.

When asked about the specifics of what constituted a “qualifying PC” for the upgrade program, Microsoft was unable to tell El Reg because, according to a Redmond flack: “This has not yet been defined.”

Despite that lack of essential knowledge, the software giant was at pains to note that any computers that had Vista loaded would be capable of running Windows 7 too.

Microsoft’s official date for Windows 7 to hit the shelves is 22 October. In the meantime, anyone eyeing up a computer will be pondering whether to postpone a purchase. Unless they’re a secret Vista lover, that is. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
BBC: We're going to slip CODING into kids' TV
Pureed-carrot-in-ice cream C++ surprise
China: You, Microsoft. Office-Windows 'compatibility'. You have 20 days to explain
Told to cough up more details as antitrust probe goes deeper
Windows 7 settles as Windows XP use finally starts to slip … a bit
And at the back of the field, Windows 8.1 is sprinting away from Windows 8
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?