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Note to employers: Better sex = happier workers

Swede makes case for workplace shag breaks

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A Swedish researcher has found that a healthy sex life leads to happier, less stressed workers - thereby suggesting that employers might consider providing workplace "comfort rooms" where hard-pressed lackeys can get their ends away in the company's best interests.

Actually, that's not true. What psychology doctoral student Ann-Christine Andersson Arntén of the University of Gothenburg really discovered is that a fulfilling domestic relationship equates to less stress at work - for women at least.

Over five years, the fearless researcher probed 900 male and female participants and asked them to rate their relationships as good, average or bad. The guinea pigs then coughed as to whether this was related to less stress at work.

In the case of the gals, if the domestic situation was good, they were happier at work, In the case of the guys, however, those admitting average relationships said they were the most harassed in the office.

Andersson kind-of explained: “When we talked to the men, they said that when it’s in-between, you have to put more effort into it. You keep doing that until the relationship either becomes better or hopeless. When you get to that point, it doesn’t really affect your health anymore.”

And before the commentards among you start decrying the total lack of insight in this sex/stress exposé, here's some ammunition for you from the department of the bleedin' obvious: Andersson also found that "men were often more interested in the frequency of sex than women, who were more inclined to value the quality of sexual relations", as The Local puts it.

Andersson failed, however, to provide a correlation between stress and average but frequent sex for males, or ground-shaking sex for women, but only every six years. Mercifully, she's poised to conduct another survey in August which may shed light on this. ®

Bootnote

The usual thanks to Mike Richards - monitor of all things Swedish - for the tip-off. Mike: I'll have to pass on the three-headed Göteborg gerbil story, I'm afraid, although the bit about the gay club animal cruelty arrests was, as you say, priceless.

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