Feeds

Microsoft pledges Java love in Sun-less world

Sample our code

3 Big data security analytics techniques

JavaOne Microsoft will keep the flame of interoperability between .NET and Java burning in the future world without Sun - currently Java's chief steward.

Dan'l Lewin, corporate vice president for strategic and emerging business development, told what's looking like the last JavaOne that Microsoft's "intent and ongoing commitment" is to make .NET and Java systems "work and work well together".

"I want to be perfectly clear that the Microsoft commitment is there to drive interoperability and collaboration because it's good for our end users and it's good for our customers," Lewin said.

He highlighted interoperability on web security, single sign on, identity, and virtualization and talked support for SAML, used in Sun identity management and Microsoft's Geneva identity server.

Joining Lewin, senior director of development platform product management Steven Marin said Microsoft would focus on building reference architectures and code samples - practical materials for developers - instead of simply supporting industry standards in .NET products.

He pointed to Microsoft's support for the Apache Software Foundation's Project Stonehenge as an indicator. As expected, and trying to light a fire under proceedings Lewin had just promised would not be episodic, Microsoft and Sun demonstrated web services interoperability between .NET and Sun's Metro web services tack for its open-source application server Glassfish using Stonehenge.

Martin said an annual survey of developers by Microsoft found - unsurprisingly - that 73 per cent of developers use Java and .Net every day. Interoperability is not a nice to have - it was a need.

"If we are not interested in interoperability we know developers and customers will vote with their feet," Martin said. "While we continue to innovate... we will not to it at the expense of interoperability. It's something we think is critically important as we go forward," Martin said.

Sun and Microsoft committed to a general agreement on interoperability five years ago as part of a broader legal settlement. But this was Microsoft's first JavaOne keynote, and it came during a JavaOne that was a long goodbye to Sun from vendors and start-ups.

It was a joint presentation that saw Redmond’s ambassadors stress their bonafides as non-Microsoft blue bloods. They talked up their careers before Microsoft. For Lewin, that involved work at Apple and Marin that was Netscape and Sun.

Martin opened by saying they "came in peace." Sun, meanwhile, announced its yet-to-launch cloud service would have Windows as a guest operating system.

That’s assuming Oracle, in the process of buying Sun, doesn’t pull the plug on Sun’s cloud.

Microsoft's pledge comes at a time uncertainty over Java's development in regards to interoperability. Sun, has - for better or worse - dominated the Java Community Process (JCP), the body that has historically developed new APIs for Java and worked to stop fragmentation.

But the JCP is not a profitably activity for Sun while many in open-source question the JCP's worth as an free or innovative body. Java in general has also suffered from rivalry between vendors such as IBM and Sun trying to dominate the language and platform.

It is unclear whether Oracle - a JCP member - will want to take on Sun's role as Java's chief steward and moderator, and take over the work of leading the majority of API work in areas like interoperability. ®

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Inside the Hekaton: SQL Server 2014's database engine deconstructed
Nadella's database sqares the circle of cheap memory vs speed
Oh no, Joe: WinPhone users already griping over 8.1 mega-update
Hang on. Which bit of Developer Preview don't you understand?
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS
Nearly 50% have NEVER tweeted a word
Internet-of-stuff startup dumps NoSQL for ... SQL?
NoSQL taste great at first but lacks proper nutrients, says startup cloud whiz
IRS boss on XP migration: 'Classic fix the airplane while you're flying it attempt'
Plus: Condoleezza Rice at Dropbox 'maybe she can find ... weapons of mass destruction'
Ditch the sync, paddle in the Streem: Upstart offers syncless sharing
Upload, delete and carry on sharing afterwards?
New Facebook phone app allows you to stalk your mates
Nearby Friends feature goes live in a few weeks
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.