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Doro 345gsm

Doro PhoneEasy 345gsm

Finger-friendly phone for senior-citizen service

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Review Swedish firm Doro's basic handsets for elderly or disabled users have been around since 2007. With the latest range of PhoneEasy handsets, the company raises the bar from its original sackcloth and ashes models in terms of build, style and functionality.

Doro 345gsm

Doro's PhoneEasy 345gsm

Unlike its super-basic cousin, the PhoneEasy 338gsm that we reviewed recently, the Doro PhoneEasy 345gsm is more like a real phone. Well, at least it's got a colour screen; you can send text messages, play games, listen to FM radio and, zooks alordies, it's even got Bluetooth. All features lacking in the cheaper phone. However, there's no Internet access, no camera and no media player – this is still very much a back to basics handset.

Stylistically, it's clearly part of the PhoneEasy range, with the same sturdy casing made of very tactile rubberised plastic – it's easy to grip, and, well, it feels really nice too. Available in black or white and it measures up exactly the same as the 338gsm at 125x52x15mm and 99g.

The keyboard is similar with outsize, although not quite so huge, buttons standing proud of the casing. It might have limited functionality, but there's no doubt it's the easiest keyboard we've ever used with our eyes shut. Our admittedly, non-scientific attempt to simulate the dialling experience of the partially sighted.

Doro 345gsm

Bright ideas: the built-in torch is adequate for reading

Gone are the one-touch A, B or C contact memory buttons, replaced by two soft keys, which, respectively, access the menu and a 300-name contacts list. Around the sides are the 2.5mm headphone socket and charger slot – although it also comes with a sturdy charging cradle – volume buttons, power button and a new torch button, which activates the light at the top of the handset. This isn't terribly bright, in truth, and is clearly intended as more of a reading aid than a tool to find your way out of a forest at night.

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