Feeds

Revealed: Full specs on SEAL Team Six multimedia setup

Clandestine commandos insisted on iPod/iPhone dock

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security for virtualized datacentres

Updated to Add

This piece from 2009 seemed worth presenting again given the now worldwide fame achieved by the Naval Special Warfare Development Group (aka SEAL Team Six) following the killing of Osama bin Laden. The lavish multimedia/computer briefing rig described below will surely have been used in planning Operation Neptune Spear*, if not in briefing the operators who actually mounted the Abottabad raid - reportedly they carried out preparations for the mission at a base in Afghanistan.

There's interesting news this week for those interested in either super-secret, super-elite special forces units or top-end home entertainment and multimedia systems. The Register can exclusively** reveal full specs on the luxurious multimedia cinema "briefing" system soon to be installed at the headquarters of the shadowy "Tier One" US ubercommando unit formerly known as "Team 6".

This unit, nowadays formally titled the Naval Special Warfare Development Group (NSWDG, or DevGru for short), selects its members from the US Navy's SEAL teams - themselves already an elite, secretive force of hand-picked commandos: the best of the best. However, the cream of the SEALs get the chance to go through even more insanely rigorous training and selection to join DevGru, meaning that the normal SEAL teams are perhaps the rest of the best of the best. This is why they are "Tier Two" special forces in US parlance, like US Army Green Berets - while the elite JSOC inner circle of Delta Force, DevGru and "the Activity" are Tier One.

Whatever. DevGru are certainly frightfully secret and deadly. It is generally thought, for instance, that it was DevGru snipers who killed three Somali pirates standing next to a captive US merchant skipper in a small lifeboat last month. The frogman-commandos apparently hit all three men in the head with simultaneous single shots fired from the deck of a US destroyer nearby, having earlier arrived on the scene by parachuting into the sea. Reports suggest that the DevGru SEALs had travelled all the way from their base in Virginia by jet transport.

At that base, of course, they will have been briefed beforehand. And it seems that the briefing facilities used just weren't up to snuff, because Reg sources** have revealed that DevGru bosses have ordered a palatial new "multimedia presentation system" to be installed at their HQ. According to procurement specs seen by the Reg**, the following features are required:

Three 52-inch LCD flatscreens with 1080p full-fat HD performance, and one similar of 46-inch size

Ceiling mounted speakers divided into three zones

Bluetooth portable touchscreen remotes, and wall-mounted touchscreens too

A central multimedia computer able to play both DVD and "Blue Rays" [sic], with 80GB to 160GB internal memory

An AV rack with "an 8x8 VGA with audio switcher, media components ... radio tuner, amplifier, processor, and video/RGB scaler"

Last but definitely not least, the SEALs specify that the system is to include an "iPod/iPhone docking bay", indicating that the Jesus mobe has penetrated even to the top-secret blackest heart of the US war machine. One does note that there's no requirement given for the setup to work with duller, more workaday handhelds such as BlackBerries, Nokias etc.

Naturally the setup is purely intended for use in official briefings. It will definitely not be used for watching movies, important sports events etc. ®

Bootnotes

*While the unit which carried out the mission has officially not been named, only the SEALs - whose badge includes a trident - would call it that. And we can be sure that this was a Tier One job, not a task for the ordinary SEAL teams.

**Depressingly, our source is as ever the interwebs. We here on the Reg special-warfare and home cinema desk did meet some US Navy SEALs once, but a good deal of beer was consumed and nothing newsworthy was remembered the next day.

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
The 'fun-nification' of computer education – good idea?
Compulsory code schools, luvvies love it, but what about Maths and Physics?
Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots
We know what the Doctor does, stop going on about it already
'Cowardly, venomous trolls' threatened with TWO-YEAR sentences for menacing posts
UK government: 'Taking a stand against a baying cyber-mob'
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
Don't bother telling people if you lose their data, say Euro bods
You read that right – with the proviso that it's encrypted
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.