Feeds

Google toys with plug-in free YouTube

HTML5 rescues browser video

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Google I/O Google has mocked up a version of YouTube built around the HTML5 video tag, playing mini-movies inside a browser sans plug-ins.

Google vice president of engineering Vic Gundotra demonstrated the mock-up during a keynote speech this morning at the company’s Google I/O developer conference in downtown San Francisco. But he stressed there are no definite plans to move YouTube to such an architecture.

"This is an experiment," he told gathered dev heads. "We are not announcing today that YouTube will be built this way. But we wanted to show it to you to get your creative juices flowing."

Browsing his not-YouTube page, he showed five or six videos or video thumbnails playing simultaneously inside his Chrome browser. "Thanks to the [HTML5] video tag, videos play right in the browser and they're intrinsic to the HTML page. If you mouse over them, they just play. Those are not ... six plug-ins. I'm not marshaling across boundaries. It's just JavaScript and video tags and that's it."

Gundotra used his morning keynote as an opportunity to evangelize HTML5, urging the gathered developers to embrace the still-gestating markup language as soon as possible. Gundotra complained that web developers took years to automatically update webpages via XMLHttpRequest (XHR) and urged them to "not make the same mistake again."

"Recognize that having the underlying capability in the browser is not enough," he told his audience. "It's up to you and companies like Google to build compelling apps that build on these capabilities."

Naturally, Gundotra showed off Google’s first mainstream HTML5 app: its "offline" version of Gmail for Android-based phones and Apple iPhones. And he asked his Google minions to demo the company's new O3D API for 3D graphics inside the browser.

The Google VP joined the Mountain View outfit after a long stint at Microsoft, and he couldn’t help but take a swipe at his former employer. Gundotra kept running to a graphic that detailed HTML5 support within what he called "modern browsers." Internet Explorer wasn’t on the list.

"You can imagine how excited we were to hear Microsoft's public statement about their commitment to the HTML5 standard," he said. "And we eagerly await actually seeing evidence of that."

Cue developer guffaws. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Munich considers dumping Linux for ... GULP ... Windows!
Give a penguinista a hug, the Outlook's not good for open source's poster child
Intel's Raspberry Pi rival Galileo can now run Windows
Behold the Internet of Things. Wintel Things
Linux Foundation says many Linux admins and engineers are certifiable
Floats exam program to help IT employers lock up talent
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Eat up Martha! Microsoft slings handwriting recog into OneNote on Android
Freehand input on non-Windows kit for the first time
Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code
Two-factor auth enabled for Kernel.org repositories
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.