Feeds

Microsoft loses NZ Windows government deal

That time is gone

Build a business case: developing custom apps

Microsoft has failed to renew a key government-wide purchasing deal for Windows, opening the door to greater use of open-source software.

Talks between Microsoft and New Zealand's State Services Commission to renew a purchase agreement for the next three years have ended without the desired agreement, as it became apparent "a formal agreement with Microsoft is no longer appropriate," the agency said.

A government spokeswoman said the government looks for value for money, fitness for purpose, and strategic benefit in its negotiations. "We didn't feel we got the appropriate levels of benefit from the negotiations," she told Computerworld.

The New Zealand government has been recognized for its adoption of open source. The collapse of the deal suggests the government feels it can now rely on its own skills and experience to a greater extent and that it has a greater choice of options from suppliers.

Under a procurement deal with Microsoft, government agencies would buy products on an opt-in basis, probably at an agreed price range in return for volume.

Negotiations between Microsoft and the government for the latest installment in this three-year agreement, which began in the year 2000, started in late 2008.

The government had established a committee of senior executives from the largest IT purchasers in the public sector to conduct the negotiations. But it seems that Microsoft could not give the purchasers what they wanted either in features, roadmap, or price.

Microsoft has now agreed to provide "recommended retail price certainty" for government agencies that will conduct their own, individual negotiations with the company, while the State Services Commission said it would support agencies exploring trying to "maximize their ICT investment and achieve greater value for money". ®

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

More from The Register

next story
Whoah! How many Google Play apps want to read your texts?
Google's app permissions far too lax – security firm survey
Chrome browser has been DRAINING PC batteries for YEARS
Google is only now fixing ancient, energy-sapping bug
Do YOU work at Microsoft? Um. Are you SURE about that?
Nokia and marketing types first to get the bullet, says report
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
EU dons gloves, pokes Google's deals with Android mobe makers
El Reg cops a squint at investigatory letters
Big Blue Apple: IBM to sell iPads, iPhones to enterprises
iOS/2 gear loaded with apps for big biz ... uh oh BlackBerry
OpenWRT gets native IPv6 slurping in major refresh
Also faster init and a new packages system
Google shows off new Chrome OS look
Athena springs full-grown from Chromium project's head
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.