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iPhone apps - the 10 smartest and the 10 stupidest

One man's meat is another man's poison

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The soon-to-be-released iPhone 3.0 software will offer a slew of new capabilities to iPhone developers. With that sea change in mind, we thought now would be a good time to take a look at the highs and lows of the current crop of apps for the iPhone and iPod touch.

Not merely the best and worst, but rather two Reg-ratified Top Ten lists: the 10 smartest and 10 stupidest apps that the iTunes App Store has to offer.

As of this weekend, App Store watchdog Apptism reported that there were over 43,000 apps offered on that online marketplace. Needless to say, our twenty picks - and the also-rans that follow them - could easily be joined by thousands of others.

As they say, one man's meat is another man's poison - but here are the iPhone apps that caught our discerning eye.

Before you dive in, note that all product links are to the App Store, and all marketing quotes are verbatim. They'd have to be. You just can't make some of this stuff up.

No. 10

Smart: FTP On The Go

They say: "If you are an IT professional or webmaster, FTP On The Go is the reason your boss should buy you an iPhone!"

The Reg says: Not only does this pocket pal pack a passle of FTP goodness, it also includes a surprisingly capable text editor.

Website unwell? Fire up this little puppy, navigate to your website, download the errant file, make your changes, then upload it back to your server.

There's also support for Office and iWork docs, PDF, iPhoto, FTPS, and the use of your iPhone or iPod touch as a file storing and sharing device.

Price: $6.99

  FTP On The Go screenshot

  Rate a Fart 2.0 screenshot

Stupid: Rate a Fart 2.0

They say: "We are confident that this is the best fart app available on the app store to date."

The Reg says: "Best fart app"? Talk about damning with faint praise. Rate a Fart, though, is a highly versatile gas-manager: relish a library of over 700 farts, then record and upload you own farts and share 'em with your friends. Web 2.0 meets intestinal discord.

But despite its farty finesse, this app is for folks who either find stupidity diverting or have embraced it as their lifestyle.

RaF's FAQ, for example, includes this stupid Q&A: "Q) Is a poop a fart? A) No. Don't record your poops." C'mon, we could have told you that.

Price: 99¢


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Next page: No. 9

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