Feeds

iTunes store Kama Sutra gives Apple warm cheeks

It's an untenable position, you big lingamheads

The essential guide to IT transformation

Apple has rejected an e-book reader from the iTunes store on the grounds that users might download a copy of the Kama Sutra - despite the same content being available in half a dozen other applications including Safari.

Eucalyptus is an app that downloads content from Project Gutenberg, and presents it with a pretty interface for reading. However, Apple has rejected it twice, citing a Victorian text-only translation of the Kama Sutra as inappropriate content even though Stanza and various other e-book readers feature illustrated versions of the same text.

Inconsistent app policies coming out of Cupertino are hardly news these days, but Eucalyptus is an extreme example. It's hard to imagine Apple treating Amazon in the same way despite the fact that Amazon's Kindle application provides access to 19 versions of the book of love, including one that proudly proclaims "With Pictures of Sex Positions", and 14 of which are based on the Victorian text cited by Apple in rejecting Eucalyptus.

Apple has amazing form here, too. Eucalyptus' author presented the app three times while explaining the source of the text, only to have two rejections returned with screenshots showing passages which could offend gentle iPhone users:

When a man wishes to enlarge his lingam, he should rub it with the bristles of certain insects that live in the trees, and then, after rubbing it for ten nights with the oils he should rub it with the bristles as before.

Pretty steamy stuff - why would anyone bother with YouPorn when there's content like that available on the iPhone?

In a desperate attempt to appease Cupertino, the author has now resubmitted Eucalyptus with a specific block to prevent that particular smut being read using the app. If that fails, perhaps some Street View style genital-reference-blurring tech solution is in order? ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
EE fails to apologise for HUGE T-Mobile outage that hit Brits on Friday
Customer: 'Please change your name to occasionally somewhere'
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.