Feeds

Nokia gets trippy with 'light messaging'

Make SMS recipients' phones light up to signal your mood

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

It can be hard to guess the sender's mood from their text messages, so Nokia has applied to patent a communications technology that uses light to express emotion.

The document – filed earlier this month – describes a technology called “light messaging” which essentially allows you text an emoticon to your friend that, when received, would cause their phone to light up in a pre-defined colour.

Nokia also described a veritable disco-in-your-pocket situation where the phone’s body would flash or pulsate after receiving a message – perhaps until you send the recipient a reply.

The Finnish giant also wants to use light messaging alongside traditional voice communications or “any other suitable form of electronic device communication”.

For example, you could opt for someone’s phone to pulse or flash red so that the recipient’s aware of your incoming call’s high priority.

Although building the technology into mobile phones would probably be Nokia’s first choice, the firm also said light messaging could be used in digital cameras, MP3 players, portable games consoles, PDAs and notebooks. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.