Feeds

Brit hover barges, airships offered to Canadian oilfields

Can Blighty beat the (partly) Canadian blimpcopter?

Security for virtualized datacentres

Hover barge? Pah. You want an airship. Or a SkyHook.

Meanwhile another British firm, Hybrid Air Vehicles, says that mere ground-skimmer barges are unambitious. What you want is a trendy "hybrid" airship - a refinement on traditional dirigibles, using aerodynamic lift to supplement that from internal helium gas cells.

Artist's concept of the JHL-40s in operation

The Canadian SkyHook JHL-40 option (being built by Boeing)

The company submit for consideration their mighty SkyCat 200, capable of lifting 200 tonnes and roughly 100 times the size of dead jubtabulous gold-digger giantess Anna Nicole Smith in length and dimensions through the body (in some directions at least). The gigantic gasbag features a massive cargo bay, and could dispense even with rivers while hauling in Alberta's new generation of oil plants.

That said, such craft usually need to take on ballast when landing cargo in order to avoid suddenly taking off again willy-nilly. The SkyCat, like most modern airship proposals, is designed to use vertical thrust and fly heavy, but even so it would seem likely to have difficulty staying under control without taking on any weight to replace a 200 tonne payload.

There are airship designers who claim to have cracked this problem, but it's noticeable that the only plan to receive backing from a major aerospace firm, the SkyHook JHL-40, uses rotor blades to keep its payload up - the gas cells are purely to support the craft itself.

The JHL-40 is actually intended for the very sort of market represented by the Alberta oilsand fields, and is actually to be operated by a Canadian firm as well - though built by Boeing. Much though Fort McMurray Today doesn't mention the big blimpcopter, it wouldn't be at all surprising to see SkyHook International beat Hovertrans and Hybrid Air Vehicles to a lot of the oilsands transport business - assuming the work doesn't simply get done by road or rail, the way such things have mainly been done for the past century and more. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Boffins who stare at goats: I do believe they’re SHRINKING
Alpine chamois being squashed by global warming
What's that STINK? Rosetta probe shoves nose under comet's tail
Rotten eggs, horse dung and almonds – yuck
Comet Siding Spring revealed as flying molehill
Hiding from this space pimple isn't going to do humanity's reputation any good
Kip Thorne explains how he created the black hole for Interstellar
Movie special effects project spawns academic papers on gravitational lensing
Experts brand LOHAN's squeaky-clean box
Phytosanitary treatment renders Vulture 2 crate fit for export
LONG ARM of the SAUR: Brachially gifted dino bone conundrum solved
Deinocheirus mirificus was a bit of a knuckle dragger
Moment of truth for LOHAN's servos: Our US allies are poised for final test flight
Will Vulture 2 freeze at altitude? Edge Research Lab to find out
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.