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6.5m vehicles to be tracked by 2012

Rubber Duck, we know where you are

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A new study of satellite tracking technology estimates that US companies are tracking 3.6 million vehicles, a number that's due to rise to 6.5 million by 2012.

The study of tracking system use was carried out by CJ Driscoll and involved interviews with over a hundred industry executives about how they are using tracking now, and how they plan to over the next three years.

The advantages of tracking your vehicle fleet are pretty well known, but while GPS kit has become very cheap, the bandwidth for getting data back to head office, in real time, is still relatively expensive. That's now changing as more bandwidth and coverage becomes available without resorting to expensive satellite links: which is why the report expects to see such rapid growth.

All that growth will, apparently, lead to an industry worth $2.4bn as companies become more aware of the advantages of knowing where everyone is, and the speed with which they can get a decent return on investment.

The full facts and figures are available for those prepared to pay several grand, while the rest of us should be grateful we still live in a time when it's possible to nip home for a sarnie without having to explain oneself. ®

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