Feeds

Proliferating mobile app stores polish their windows

Qualcomm opens up, Microsoft shares, Nokia gears up

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Qualcomm is to support alternative platforms in its application store, Plaza Retail, while details of Microsoft's Marketplace emerge and Nokia's Ovi starts acting suspiciously.

Qualcomm is to allow apps for competing platforms to be sold through its store in a move that acknowledges Brew's failure to conquer the world, while Microsoft has revealed that apps purchased through its Marketplace can be installed on multiple devices as well as returned within 24 hours. Meanwhile, Nokia users are reporting the disappearance of the company's Download! Service along with changes to the Ovi site that could indicate an imminent launch of the much-awaited Ovi Store.

Qualcomm has long provided an app store to network operators who've deployed handsets based on its Brew platform, managing every part of the application life cycle in a process that's as popular with developers as it is hated by users. Brew handsets are locked down - rather more effectively than Apple's iPhone - so applications can't be delivered by any other means. However, they can take advantage of Brew APIs that provide access to device and network features including micro-charging and communications.

Brew has had some success, but it has also annoyed users who found themselves unable to change a ringtone or background graphic without their operator's approval. With even American operators now forced to support a range of handsets, it makes sense for Qualcomm to expand the Plaza.

Java and BlackBerry apps will come first, followed by native platforms including Windows Mobile, Android and Symbian, and applications won't be locked to a specific device (as Brew demands), allowing users to migrate applications as they buy new devices.

Microsoft's Marketplace will also allow applications to be moved between handsets, as long as those devices (up to five of them) have been registered with the Marketplace. This should address a problem comprehensively solved by the original Palm OS (which linked app registrations to the identity of the user rather than the device) of having to re-purchase applications each time one buys a new phone.

The news comes from a presentation at the Tech Ed conference, as reported by Computerworld. Microsoft Product Planner Daniel Bouie admitted that such flexibility could allow a group of friends to share applications, but it's hard to see that as a significant risk.

Bouie also said that device registration would be managed by Microsoft's LiveID (the service formally known as "Passport"), which should be up to the task.

Meanwhile, the much-anticipated launch of Nokia's Ovi Store could be imminent, as All About Symbian is reporting that the Download! on-handset application-store client is inoperable for a "maintenance break", and that the Ovi site has started asking for registration details. The Ovi Store is expected to launch before the end of the month, so it could be any day now, but it's going to have to be pretty spectacular to stand out in what has become such a crowded industry. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
UK fuzz want PINCODES on ALL mobile phones
Met Police calls for mandatory passwords on all new mobes
Canadian ISP Shaw falls over with 'routing' sickness
How sure are you of cloud computing now?
Don't call it throttling: Ericsson 'priority' tech gives users their own slice of spectrum
Actually it's a nifty trick - at least you'll pay for what you get
Three floats Jolla in Hong Kong: Says Sailfish is '3rd option'
Network throws hat into ring with Linux-powered handsets
Fifteen zero days found in hacker router comp romp
Four routers rooted in SOHOpelessly Broken challenge
New Sprint CEO says he will lower axe on staff – but prices come first
'Very disruptive' new rates to be revealed next week
PwC says US biz lagging in Internet of Things
Grass is greener in Asia, say the sensors
Ofcom sees RISE OF THE MACHINE-to-machine cell comms
Study spots 9% growth in IoT m2m mobile data connections
O2 vs Vodafone: Mobe firms grab for GCHQ, gov.uk security badge
No, the spooks love US best, say rival firms
Ancient pager tech SMS: It works, it's fab, but wow, get a load of that incoming SPAM
Networks' main issue: they don't know how it works, says expert
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.