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AMD to imprint 'Caspian' laptop CPU at Computex?

We'd really like to see the Fusion-class 'Llano'

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AMD's 45nm die-shrink Turion X2 Ultra processor and the next major incarnation of the chip maker's Socket S1 interconnect will be demo'd at Computex early next month.

So claims Chinese-language newspaper the Commercial Times, putting a date to the appearance of chippery that first saw light of day in AMD roadmaps that surfaced late last year.

The upcoming dual-core mobile processor is codenamed 'Caspian' and is believed to be a 45nm version of the current Turion X2 Ultra, the 65nm 'Griffin'. Like Griffin, Caspian will support DDR 2 memory and contain 2MB of L2 cache, it's thought.

Caspian will form part of 'Tigris', a bundle of components for big laptops that includes AMD's RS880M chipset and M9X graphics processor.

CT speculates that AMD may also show off 'Champlain', a four-core notebook processor that has a DDR 3-capable memory controller. But Champlain - and the 'Danube' platform it's set to form a part of - aren't expected until 2010, so a Computex 2009 showing might seem premature.

Caspian and Tigris are due to ship in H2 2009, past AMD roadmaps have shown.

Caspian and Champlain look set to be AMD's last notebook CPUs without on-board graphics technology before the introduction of the 32nm 'Llano', the first 'Fusion' laptop CPU, in 2011. ®

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