Feeds

IBM kicks out Nehalem-free racks, towers

Not everyone needs it. Yet

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

While Moore's Law is cramming more and more computing power into a processor socket, not every customer needs a quad-core "Nehalem EP" two socket box to run their applications. Selling into the SMB channel with its System x server line has been tough for IBM in the past three quarters, particularly because in a tough economy SMBs start shopping more on price and less on performance.

That's why Big Blue, which has been struggling against Hewlett-Packard and Dell, has announced new entry tower and rack servers based on older and less costly processors than Intel's current quad-core chips. The System x3200 M2 is a single-socket tower server that supports the dual-core Pentium E5300, the Core 2 Duo E7400, the Xeon E3110, and the Xeon X3330 processors.

The machine has 512 MB of DDR2 main memory standard, which is just about enough to load Windows, and it maxes out at 8 GB. The tower has seven drive bays, which can house hot-swap SATA or SA drives in 3.5-inch form factors and has two PCI-X slots, two PCI-Express slots (one x4 and one x8), and a single Gigabit Ethernet NIC on the board. A RAID 5 disk controller is optional. In a base configuration on IBM's online store - an x3200 M2 with a 2.4 GHz Core 2 Duo E4600 and 2 GB of memory (not the 512 MB of base memory in the spec sheets, because that is not a practical amount of main memory) - the machine costs $957.

The System x3250 M2 is a rack-based single-socket server that comes in a 1U form factor and supports Intel's Celeron 440, dual-core Pentium E5300, and Core 2 Duo E7400 processors. (The Xeon E3110 and X3330 are not sold in this skinny box, apparently, but IBM's online Web store shows the quad-core X3320 and X3350 are available for the machine even though it is not on the spec sheet).

This machine has a SATA controller and sports two 3.5-inch SATA drives. It has two PCI-Express x8 expansion slots and two Gigabit Ethernet ports. The x3250 M2 comes with 1 GB of DDR2 memory standard and expands to 8 GB. With a 2 GHz Celeron 440 and no disks, the x3250 M2 costs $691.

Both new entry x64 servers will be available on June 19. Both machines are certified to run the usual SMB suspects in terms of operating systems, including Microsoft's Windows Server 2008 Web, Standard, and Enterprise Editions as well as Red Hat's Enterprise Linux 4 and 5 and Novell's SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9 and 10. Windows Server 2003 is not on the list of certified operating systems for the rack-based x3250, but it is the default preloaded operating system on the tower x3200 M2 according to IBM's announcement letter, but online, RHEL and SUSE are the only options when you go to buy the box. Go figure. ®

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

More from The Register

next story
Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway
Combine Blu-ray and M-DISC and you get this monster
US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux
OAM takes wireless signals to 32 Gbps
Apple flops out 2FA for iCloud in bid to stop future nude selfie leaks
Millions of 4chan users howl with laughter as Cupertino slams stable door
Students playing with impressive racks? Yes, it's cluster comp time
The most comprehensive coverage the world has ever seen. Ever
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Run little spreadsheet, run! IBM's Watson is coming to gobble you up
Big Blue's big super's big appetite for big data in big clouds for big analytics
Seagate's triple-headed Cerberus could SAVE the DISK WORLD
... and possibly bring us even more HAMR time. Yay!
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.