Feeds

London cab & bus trials for satnav speed-governor kit

'Satellites will turn us all into ZOMBIES!'

Top three mobile application threats

London government plans for self-adjusting speed governing kit, capable of automatically keeping a vehicle below the local speed limit, are advancing. Trials in the capital will take place this summer.

The equipment in question is known as Intelligent Speed Adaptation (ISA), and has been under development since at least 2007 when the Reg last reported on it. ISA works out the speed limit for the road it's on by using GPS satnav to locate the vehicle on its onboard speed-limit map. It can then either warn the driver in the case of speeding, or if set to do so cut the throttle if the vehicle accelerates through the legal maximum. The system has no braking authority.

TfL envisage ISA initially being deployed on buses, cabs and so forth - perhaps from 2010. The transport authority believes that it would have significant effects in reducing fatal accidents, noting that most such occur in areas with a 30mph limit or less. The six-month trial starting this summer will see the gear fitted to a bus, a black cab and another 20 vehicles used by TfL road engineers, traffic managers and highway inspectors.

Use on private vehicles would be optional, and probably not very widespread. However, TfL does suggest that there could be incentives in the near term for private drivers to have it fitted - for instance there might be scope to reduce licence points or avoid driving bans. There are already TfL congestion-charging exemptions and free parking for other kinds of vehicle technology the authority wishes to encourage, such as hybrid or electric vehicles.

Pleasingly for those primarily worried about privacy, the system offers little scope for surveillance as it doesn't inform any offboard systems of the vehicle's location. A TfL spokesman told the Reg today that in future the equipment might include a mobile data channel for map updates, but "we haven't decided" even on that, and in any event such a channel wouldn't be designed for upload of any vehicle data or records. Nor would the ISA box keep any such records on board, according to TfL:

Note the devices do not store any information regarding location, time or any other variable, including driver speed over the length of a journey.

Compared to the sort of kit being discussed for purposes of national road pricing/"managed motorway" schemes, ISA would have little or no privacy and surveillance implications.

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Putin tells Snowden: Russia conducts no US-style mass surveillance
Gov't is too broke for that, Russian prez says
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Lavabit loses contempt of court appeal over protecting Snowden, customers
Judges rule complaints about government power are too little, too late
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Don't let no-hire pact suit witnesses call Steve Jobs a bullyboy, plead Apple and Google
'Irrelevant' character evidence should be excluded – lawyers
EFF: Feds plan to put 52 MILLION FACES into recognition database
System would identify faces as part of biometrics collection
Ex-Tony Blair adviser is new top boss at UK spy-hive GCHQ
Robert Hannigan to replace Sir Iain Lobban in the autumn
Edward Snowden on his Putin TV appearance: 'Why all the criticism?'
Denies Q&A cameo was meant to slam US, big-up Russia
Banks slap Olympus with £160 MEEELLION lawsuit
Scandal hit camera maker just can't shake off its past
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.